Should I try it with a hand plane?

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I'm planning to make a good bookcase, about 5 ft high, with glass doors using red oak. This will be my first project using solid oak. I have neither a power planer nor a jointer but I have a good table saw. I could try to get the wood I need ready dressed but there are advantages to buying it rough.
I have a good hand plane and I know how to sharpen it. If I buy rough lumber I'll have to flatten it, remove twists and cups, and reduce it to final thickness, all with the hand plane. I'm aware that once I get one edge very straight I can do some of the squaring with my table saw.
I'm strictly an amateur so time does not matter. I like using hand equipment although I've never worked oak by hand. My question is: would I be stupid to try to do this project with rough wood and a hand plane?
Maybe I'll just have to try a few pieces to see what it's like but I'm wondering how many experienced woodworkers would try this.
Thanks, Billy
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Well, if you truly go from "rough to ready" you need more than just one plane to do it properly. Initially you'll use a scrub plane to hog off wood quickly and get it close to flat. Then clean this up with a jack plane or fore plane. At this point it is probably pretty good. You'll want a jointer to get the edges nice and straight and square the faces. And you'll want a smoothing plane to get the surface finish-ready. If the grain is gnarly (maybe not too likely with red oak, but you never know), you might want a high-angle smoother or a scraping plane. So, if you just have the one plane, (probably a smoother ?) you might be in for a tough time. If you have multiple irons, you could grind one with a curved profile and open the mouth and probably get away with it for roughing out and getting close to flat. I'm sure it can be done, and if you enjoy the process you'll probably learn a lot and have a blast.
Mike

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Mike has a good post. Two questions: 1.How big are your arms? 2. How's the aerobic conditioning? Seriously.
Bob

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calmly ranted:

Billy's arms will be bigger when he's done with the project.

It'll be better when he's done.

Yes, it's serious sweatwork, but it's worth it if the old bod can handle it.
-- Friends Don't Let Friends Eat Turkey and Drive --
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: Mike has a good post. Two questions: : 1.How big are your arms? : 2. How's the aerobic conditioning? : Seriously.
Equally seriously, how flat is your bench top?
Jeff G
--
Jeff Gorman, West Yorkshire, UK
Email: username is amgron
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Alex
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Least expensive scrub plane:
A #4
A coarse and fine stone to put some crown on the iron.
A file to open the mouth (if needed)
A screwdriver to shunt the frog back.
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On Sat, 20 Nov 2004 02:57:08 +0000, Andy Dingley

That's an interesting tool company.

Sacre bleu! You can't say that on a family newsgroup! (Oops, this isn't the SoffDreck.)
-- Friends Don't Let Friends Eat Turkey and Drive --
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On Sat, 20 Nov 2004 06:41:09 -0800, Larry Jaques

And for small volume metal planes, those are _very_ reasonable prices.
--
Smert' spamionam

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is a lot more in their paper catalog than on their website too. I did it and will order some parts for my Stanley 71. Lots of parts they make.
Alex
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All right, now this is starting to bug me... I did fill out the form for the paper catalog, but where in the heck are the prices, or the tools? The site only seems to have a picture of a #51 smoothing plane, and a video that's on sale.

Aut inveniam viam aut faciam
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than you have described. And more than that in the current catalog. Really cool company so far, as far as products. Talked to a man there about having a blade made for my #8, $30 okay, torch hardening then oil quenching, naw, Hock time. Atmosphere controlled ovens, yes. But St. James Bay is great for a lot more than that!
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Prometheus wrote:

It bugged me too until I figured out that the website was coded properly. That front page is really split into two sections. UNder the bar beneath "The St. James Bay Tool Co. is another line that you can only see the barest part of. It reads: New products Tools Videos. Try running your cursor across that area and look for changes in your location bar, or whatever. If it doesn't, the URLs are: http://www.stjamesbaytoolco.com/newproducts.html http://www.stjamesbaytoolco.com/featured.html http://www.stjamesbaytoolco.com/videos.html
Hope that helps. Dave in Fairfax
--
Dave Leader
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wrote:

Ahh, yes. When I looked again, there are just three tiny lines there. Thanks!

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Mike already gave you an excellent reply. One thing that might have been assumed, but is not true. Do you have a decent bench or some means of supporting the boards when you plane them? A plane without a good steady support for the work piece is a lost cause.
With a few clamps and some ingenuity, you can turn a table saw top into a workable make-do work surface for planing.
Bob
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DAGS on these quoted terms: "table saw jointing" & "jointing on the table saw" The Table Saw Book: (Amazon.com product link shortened)00899292/sr=1-3/ref=sr_1_3/102-9208339-5187338?v=glance&s=books Jim Tolpin's Table Saw Magic, Second Edition: (Amazon.com product link shortened)00899292/sr=1-2/ref=sr_1_2/102-9208339-5187338?v=glance&s=books
I do not own a table saw, I am no expert, just would love to "have" a table saw, myself. Just trying to help.
Alex
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On Fri, 19 Nov 2004 14:37:16 -0500, "Billy Smith"

go for it. hand tools are a joy to use...
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-snip-

Good quality, properly cared for and tuned hand tools are a joy to use. I'm sure that many of us here have a story about their first paper-thin shaving out of a freshly-sharpened plane. For me, anyway, it was something like a religious experience.
On the other hand, low quality, beater or dull hand tools are awful, evil and hateful.
I once heard a story from somebody that involved a poorly tuned $5 yard sale plane, a maple bedside tabletop that was nearly perfect, but required maybe one more pass. Poor technique and poor tuning on this fated last pass caused the plane to chatter, leaving nicely spaced digs across the otherwise perfect tabletop. The owner of said plane threw the plane at the benchtop. Rather than cracking like you'd expect a cast-iron plane to do, the plane took its revenge by taking a physics-defying bounce. It went almost completely sideways, right through the shop window, landing softly in the grass outside. That window was not replaced with glass - plexi seemed the more prudent choice. Er, um, at least, that's what I heard...
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: : I once heard a story from somebody that involved a poorly tuned $5 yard sale : plane, a maple bedside tabletop that was nearly perfect, but required maybe : one more pass. Poor technique and poor tuning on this fated last pass : caused the plane to chatter, leaving nicely spaced digs across the otherwise : perfect tabletop.
To me, this seems more like skitter than chatter.
For elucidation, please see my web site - Planing Notes - Skitter and Chatter.
Jeff G
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

I can't see why it would be stupid. Did quite a bit of it myself when I first started and hand tools were about all I had.
--
MikeG
Heirloom Woods
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