Shopsmith pricing

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I have heard that a new Shopsmith machine now costs $3,000. Knowing what good quality Jet, Delta, and Grizzly equipment costs, this leads me to ask three questions. (1) Are the people at Shopsmith completely out of their minds in their pricing?, (2) How is it that Shopsmith is still in business with that kind of pricing?, and (3) Does anybody actually buy Shopsmith machines at this sort of price?
I mean, it's a fairly nicely made machine, pretty compact, and pretty durable, but $3,000?
Am I missing something?
- GRL
"It's good to want things."
Steve Barr (philosopher, poet, humorist, chemist, Visual Basic programmer)
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GRL wrote:

I've seen them for sale for many years. IIRC, they wre always advertised in Popular Science and the like. For the price, you can get a nice collectionof individual machines, but the space is a selling factor.
I read the local shoppers paper looking for tools. The most popular tool for sale is the Craftsman table saw, Craftsman RAS, and the Shopsmith. I've have never seen a Delta or Jet and only once saw a Grizzley. I don['t know what conclusions you can draw from that, b ut my guess is that people buy them with good intentions and find woodworking is not a good hobby for them. Ed snipped-for-privacy@snet.net http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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I went to an auction tonight.
One I'm guessing was 13 years old (manual had a pub date of '91) went for $700. It looked like it had never been plugged in. I mean it no saw dust in the cracks, no scratches anywhere, the table ways looked perfect, and the installed saw blade had never been used.
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Mark

N.E. Ohio
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wrote:

I watched a demo a couple of weeks ago at the local borg. The guy doing it was really good and made the machine sound irresistable. However I have a shop full of better tools so I was truly just a spectator. I did notice that he rolled the price out without so much as a cough. I couldn't have done that. In fact, I coughed myself.
One spectator mentioned the possibility of buying one for his son. I am SO glad that my family knows better than to buy me tools without checking first. I would have been very disappointed if my parents had popped almost 3 grand for a Shopsmith for me.
Later, I looked at several ebay auctions and felt sick that the one guy was close to writing a check at the borg when he could save more than $2K by going online and buying used.
Of course that's just me. Maybe he would have liked a Shopsmith.
- - LRod
Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999
http://www.woodbutcher.net
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LRod wrote:

Isn't that how most are sold, at demos at fairs and the like? I've never seen one in a retail store.
I think they rank right up there with Rainbow vacuum cleaners and Ginsu knives.
--
Ed
snipped-for-privacy@snet.net
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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I think they offer value to the user with little space but otherwise they appeal to those new to the sport. Yes woodworking is a sport. ;~)

Rainbow vacuums... ;~) An expensive MUD PIE mixer.
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My wife managed to snag one at a garage sale for $50, and sold it on eBay for $500. Not too bad for a couple of hours' work.
Wish we could do that four or five times a week!! -- www.MyNewThreads.com <-- wife's eBay store www.FreshCoffee.biz <-- our new coffee store
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Howard Lee Harkness
Insurance for H1-Bs: http://www.H1Bins.com
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wrote:

For my sister in-laws sake we let a Rainbow rep perform the show at out house. She would get a discount on the one that she had on order. He compared it to our new Ricar vac and failed miserably.. You know the scene, run our vacuum over a heavily traveled area 100 times and then he uses the Rainbow to go over the same spot with a black cloth in the hose to catch what ours missed... Sure enough there was dirt on the black cloth.. Then I said let me run my vac again with a black cloth in the same spot that the Rainbow had been run... You guessed it, more dirt. Ours passed the bright light pointed at the exhaust test also.
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Actually Ginsu knives are great!! ...and I'm one who is very picky about knives in the kitchen.
--
Don

"Leon" < snipped-for-privacy@swbell.net> wrote in message
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And the problem with Ginsu knives is? Not enough tomatoes or cans?
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Just the way they are sold. They actually do work for a while and I even own one. Ed
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Dang, did they lower prices.. IIRC they were more than that.
Knowing what good quality Jet, Delta, and Grizzly equipment costs, this leads me to ask

Apparently not... I think the same thing about Radio Shack and yet they seem as solvent as ever.
(2) How is it that Shopsmith is still in business

I guess they use Radio Shack as a business model.
(3) Does anybody actually buy Shopsmith machines at this sort of price?
I guess the same question can be asked about Ford, or GM or Chrysler.

Sounds like more of a bargain than say 20 years ago.

I guess so.
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1. They seeem to follow the Lee Valley model of customer service.
2. The equipment is well made and you can get parts for and all upgrades fit the 40 to 50 year old models.
3. It's a niche market.
4. They seeem to follow the Lee Valley model of customer service.
5. They are "American Made" for all those of you willing to pay mightily for that honor.
6. They have been losing money for a number of years (although I think they may have posted a small profit last year) and have retrenched to just one store (in Dayton, OH). They used to have a number of retail stores and used to be sold through Woodcraft (in fact many of their retail stores were bought by Woodcraft when they closed them). They have always used demos (malls, county fairs, etc.) and recently began a demo relationship with Lowes - you can buy through Lowes during the demo.
7.They seeem to follow the Lee Valley model of customer service.
8. The base unit (model 505) sells for I believe $1,995. That includes some tooling like a couple of saw blades, lathe tools, etc. and I believe includes one major attacment such as the bandsaw or strip sander. (I guess they follow the Lee Valley pricing model too).....just a joke Robin - while I have never purchased anything from Lee Valley I do drool over the catalog periodically.
Dave Hall
(PS I bought my 1992 model 510 with the bandsaw, jointer, strip sander, DC3300 dust colletor, numerous blades, bits, sanding disks, belts, lathe tools, etc. etc. - along with a downdraft sanding table, Dewalt ROS, a bunch of non-shopsmith stuff- for $1,250 a couple of years ago. I then sold my 1982 model 500, bandsaw, jointer and a bunch of related tooling (but less than what I had just bought) for the same $1,250.)
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My second major power tool was a new Shopsmith. Now that was a couple or so decades ago so I imagine, COLA being what it is, what I paid then is relatively what they cost now.
I bought it then because I believed the advertising about the unit being good for a small area shop, which my first one was, quality, and customer support.
You know something, every bit of that advertising was true.I got major, stand alone, brand quality with what I can only describe as, over the years, world class service. The machine never let me down nor failed to do what was asked of it. Too date the only thing on the machine that has needed replacement was the power switch.
As the years went by my shops grew in size and my requirements changed and I have some heavier metal in my shop. But you know, the Shopsmith is still there and frequently in use. I've never bought another lathe, drill press or half a dozen other major tools because that old Shopsmith is still pulling it's weight for many different functions.
--
Mike G.
snipped-for-privacy@heirloom-woods.net
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If memory serves, I have a mental image of some of Norm's early shows . . . he was using a Shopsmith. I don't think it was just a 'demo', that was what he had, or only had a little space.
Regards, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop

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Was that just before NYW took on DELTA TOOLS as a "corporate underwriter" or whatever the term for advertiser is with PBS. Back then, I think he used several other brands of tools. When "DELTA" came on-board, all other tools disappeared. Probably just a coincidence though.
I wonder what tools Norm uses in his personal shop?
DexAZ
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Dex, BEFORE the 'green' and 'blue' ones - remember the 'strategically placed' strips of black tape?
The 'DELTA's ' came later. Now everything is 'coordinated'.
Just goes back to that 'old saw' about 'a poor workman blames his tools'. It AIN'T the tools, Sport. It's the guy using them.
The only thing I *REALLY* lust after is his 'dead flat' concrete floor/space.
Regards, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop
SNIP

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wrote:

There were nine (sort of) Shopsmith tools used, mostly in the first season. Interestingly, never the saw. Of course that's because there's been a Unisaur there from the very first episode. It was a Rockwell originally, but a Delta replaced in '84 (6th season). Space was never the issue. The shop has been the same building since episode #1.
I have been given to understand that Shopsmith sought an underwriting deal with Morash in the beginning, but apparently there was too wide a gulf in the $$$ asked vs $$$ available.

Well, I don't know if you're talking about major tools or any power tools, although it doesn't matter, because the oscillating spindle sander he uses (as recently as episode 1606, the dower chest, which many of you haven't even seen yet), for example, is not a Delta, and Delta makes one.
It's just not a given that when Delta/Porter-Cable came in all the other brands disappeard. Does Bosch jigsaw, Lamello biscuit joiner, and Senco brad nailer ring a bell? How about the granddaddy of all non-Delta tools: the Timesavers wide belt sander? And although it hasn't been used in years, the Makita D-handle router is in the top nine of tools used in over 200 episodes.
I will concede that there are more Delta and Porter-Cable tools used today than there were ten years ago. I suppose that's a benefit of the underwriting of the show.
- - LRod
Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999
http://www.woodbutcher.net
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LRod, recheck your records, IIRC you are correct that the Shopsmith was never used as a TS but I do remember a Delta Contractors saw being used before the Unisaw.
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On Sat, 28 Feb 2004 00:20:59 GMT, "Leon"

Nope, the (a) Unisaw has been there from the first. The first two episodes of the second season featured the contractors saw as did a later episode builidng the garage workshop. Pardon a little whoring, but if you go to the Norm's Tools section of my site and click on either "Delta" or "Saws" and then click on "Contractors Saw" you'll see I have it documented much as I've said here.
What may be confusing you is that for a long time (I couldn't/don't want to tell you how many episodes) the safety speech featured a cut on the contractors saw, and for most of the second season you could see it sitting over in the corner near the door.
But thanks for the challenge.
- - LRod
Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999
http://www.woodbutcher.net
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