Shellac

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On 26 Apr 2011 11:20:46 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:>Rubbing shellac with steel wool produces a beautiful low-gloss finish that

Yeah, and try waxing your Johnson. Oops, I meant to say "Try applying Johnson's Paste Wax with 0000 steel wool." It produces a wood with a wunnerful "hand". That's why I prefer the hand-rubbed oil finishes. You can still feel the wood underneath.
I tried Behlen's Rockhard Table Top Finish on the dining set I recycled and it left a nice, hard, shiny, but PLASTIC finish. Tiny scratches show up from repairing tools on it, too. <sigh>
Newp, no mo. I'll stick with Waterlox, my fave finish.
-- Make up your mind to act decidedly and take the consequences. No good is ever done in this world by hesitation. -- Thomas H. Huxley
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It does produce a different finish. A little higher sheen, but just as smooth. I haven't decided if I like it better, it might be one of those things where either way works well.
I also tried applying the wax after rubbing with the steel wool. You can still feel the wax on the wood. *snip*
Puckdropper
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Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in

I applied multiple thin layers of Johnson paste wax using 0000 steel wool, and then a car polisher to polish the dried wax (>1 hour). The finish is glass smooth and low satiny shine. On my pine blanket chest it has lasted decades ...
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Best regards
Han
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Puckdropper says...

Yep.
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I have been using a 0000 buffed finish on most of my turned bowls for quite sometime. Something I have found that really bring out the "c_________"(somebody spell the word for me) that really deep luster that makes you feel as if you are being drawn into the wood is a product called "Wood Cream." I have no idea where I got my jar, but it can be googled and ordered from the manufactorer in Washington State. It is entirely food safe and gives such a rich deep finish that I almost never open the can of Briwax that is sittiing under it.
Before any of you shouts - no I do not live under a bridge. ;-)
Deb
wrote:

low-gloss finish that

couple of days ago when I

different; it's warm

nicely it turns out.

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On 4/26/2011 12:00 PM, Dr. Deb wrote:

"chatoyance" ... in French (at least in S Louisiana) it sorta equates to the look in a cats eye.
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Is that why I'm unable to maintain my cat's food limit when she sits there and looks at me until I give her more?
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On Apr 26, 7:20am, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

If you like gloss, Turtle Wax scratch and swirl remover is the icing on the cake. You'll know when the surface is like glass when the buffing rag makes squeaking noises like a rag on a freshly Windexed window.
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Is there any silicone to worry about with that product? My primary concern would be cross contamination from getting some on a bench or table.
Puckdropper
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On Apr 27, 12:35am, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

That was my first question about the product. None that I can see, according to the MSDS.
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In article <371216ef-f67e-4168-be03-f2d6c3e0d974

in
If you want to be sure, then use the equivalent product from Meguiars or 3M (I think it would be Meguiars Swirl Remover M0916 or M0901 or 3M Perfect-It Ultrafine Machine Polish 06069, 06068, or 39062--the different numbers are for different sizes). The Meguiars and 3M are body-shop products and would be silicone-free. The Meguiars works fine for me with lacquer and polyurethanes and has never given any kind of problem.
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I'm biased toward Meguiar's, based on others' recommendations, shame Walmart didn't carry it.
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"Father Haskell" wrote in message

I'm biased toward Meguiar's, based on others' recommendations, shame Walmart didn't carry it.
Meguiar's is a bit too upscale for WalMart.
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@swbelldotnet says...

Meguiars and 3M see themselves as making products for the professional market. Only one store in this area (that I've been able to find and that Meguiars is aware of) has a major portion of their product line, and 3M you find only at automotive paint suppliers.
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On 4/26/2011 7:20 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

Yes, particularly on hardwoods. I spray it on, let it dry a bit, spray it again. On the lathe, I just wipe it on with a rag. Can't say I like it much on Pine or softwoods so much. 0000 is the way to go.
I sometimes use it to seal pool cue shafts and apply it with a rag. Let it dry for 15-20 minutes (it drys almost immediately on a spinning lathe) and then sand it "all" off with 600 grit and or a magic eraser. You can't really get it all off, so what is left is a nicely sealed smooth shaft.
--
Jack
You're never too old to learn something stupid.
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