Shed Floor Plan Question

I bought some plans for a shed. I was a little disappointed to be honest, but anyway I have a question. Please.
It says to use 2x4 for the rim joist and for the the "bottome sid of wooden floor" use 2x4 treated floor beams. The deck is 2x6 material.
so, and excuse my terms, the "box" or the rim and the other three outside parts of the floor "box" are all 2x4 and the joists are all 2x4. Didn't sound that, well, sound. They do suggest a concrete slab, so maybe that's why.
They plans are for 12x8 or 12x12 or 12x16. It say just to adjust the 2x4 length accordingly.
Every other set of plans seem to use something more sturdy for the floor like 2x6 or 2x10. I wanted to get your thoughts. I'm not sure I like the plans. I found free ones that looked better and were easier to follow.
Thanks.
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hmm...
are you supporting my original hypothesis that plans aren't ALWAYS the best way to go? :)
Under the floor of my shed (T&G Studifloor - 1 1/4" thick), I've got PT 2x6's. The walls are 2x4, just like in a house. The roof is built pretty much like a house also. The walls have a sole plate, and above the studs are TWO layers of 2x4's, which are cut at each wall end, so as to overlap with the adjacent wall. That makes for very sturdy construction. I've walked all over the roof and nothing budges (215+ lbs).
I didn't mention it, but I've got a bunch of concrete pavers imbedded and leveled, under the 2x6's. Sand/cement was shoveled around them and then watered. Been stable for more than 5 years. But don't forget, I'm in CA where if it gets below freezing, it only stays there a few hours.
2x4 under the floor sounds kinda cheesy, IMHO.
You are wise to be suspicious of those plans you've got in front of you.
dave
jm wrote:

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JM:
The plans are only a start, in my opinion. I built my shed the same way Bay Area Dave did - PT 2x6, 4x6 PT timbers as the skeds. No concrete - not needed. The walls were 2x4 with plywood sheathing. VERY stable, very solid. The only other thing I did, was to dig a deep area and layered it with stone and drainage pipe, as where I built it was wet and water would run down underneath it and stay there if I didn't figure out a way to handle it. Your plans will vary.
Plans help you to work through some of the details of things like roofs, etc. But walls and foundations, are always the same. It is up to you, depending on your situation what you need to do. In most municipalities, you can build a free standing building of less then 120sqft without a permit. Some places you might need one. Also you got to respect your setbacks, otherwise a nasty neighbor might yell to the permits dept. I can recall in the town I was in, a person running for the council had a old shed, that wasn't legal, in her backyard. Someone complained when she announced her candidacy. All she needed to do was to get it permitted. Wasn't a big deal. Don't sweat it. If you every sell your house, you will have to disclose the fact you never got a permit, if you needed one, otherwise, it was a legit building.
Have fun. This is good training ground for learning things. I know I had fun.
MJ Wallace
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says...

Pressure Treated Lumber,,, the green colored lumber found at most lumber yards,,,,, its treated with chemicals to resist rot
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Post to misc.rural they'll know and have lots of helpful advice.

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