shed design

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Depends on which part of the breaker you're talking about. The terminal where the branch circuit connects to the breaker is always a screw terminal, but the connection of the breaker to the bus bar is definitely a stab connection.
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On 2/23/11 1:12 AM, Morgans wrote:

I've had similar situations where I found something not working and swore off using it ever again, but one guy finding two bad outlets isn't exactly overwhelming evidence.
FWIW, I've gotten bad switches straight out of the box. I chalked it up to a bad lot... I didn't swear off switches. :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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True. and if I wired for a living, I would probably use the stabs to be profitable. For myself, I will take the time to screw down the wires and eliminate on possible source of a problem.
--
Jim in NC


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Thanks for the information. This year in New Brunswick a few commercial roofs did collapsed under the weight of snow and ice. I like to idea of re-enforcing the trusses with wooden plates. While driving to the ski hills I noticed that the Gambrel roof (like your) does not accumulate snow and ice as much as the traditional roof design. That will the design that I will be using for my shed.
Denis M.
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On 2/21/2011 11:57 AM, Denis M wrote:

Yes, that is a nice design, uses little material and it is easy to build, particularly with the truss plates. I said they were "flimsy" but they are very strong and will not spread vertically. They bend easily horizontally but their is no pressure on them to bend once the roof is on. I put the wooden plates on because mentally I couldn't handle thinking about those little hunks of tin holding up my roof. I doubt the wood did any more than give me piece of mind:-).
I gotta tell you again though, you really want bigger than 8x10 and you might as well put on a second floor. The second floor is the only thing that keeps the first floor semi-uncluttered. There is not much extra cost, and it does not have to be built like a house, it's just for storing junk, not car engines or pianos. More like deck chairs, a lawn seeder you use once every 20 years, kids toys that you know will be worth a fortune 25 years from now, tents you will never use again, that kind of stuff. You will thank yourself for the rest of time.
--
Jack
I wondered why the baseball was getting bigger. Then it hit me.
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On Tue, 15 Feb 2011 17:38:11 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com"

Not a problem unless you're in heavy-snow-load country or local codes prohibit it. I'd go with either composition roofing (glued down) or metal roofing with sealed top flashing.

I have a 3:12 pitch roof on the house and a 1:10 slope on the carport. Works for me.

Howzbout something like a shed roof style? <g>
http://www.just-sheds.com/1210-R11.gif

Perhaps.
-- The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly is to fill the world with fools. --Herbert Spencer
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Close to the house I would want the shed to resemble the house with similiar siding, trim and roof. 3x12 is a little flat for 3-tab.
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3.12 "shed" roof (no gable, sloped only one way) not in snow country works fine with standard shingles if the prevailing winds are not "up the roof" and if you increase your overlap about 25%. DO NOT forget the roofing felt under the shingles, and the drip edges. BluSeal self stick membrane or ice sheild over the whole roof is never a bad idea either.
As far as code goes, in most places as long as there is no foundation (ot is a "temporary" or "portable" building and under 100 sq feet no code applies and no permit is required. Just make sure it is tied down well enough to withstand the highest foreseeable wind gusts!!!
Nothing like watching your shed roll down the block in a wind storm!
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My biggest concern after building just what you suggest was that I found out that I lost a lot of overhead storage room, and a small shed fills up fast enough to make it hard to get much in or out. I had a 10 x 14. I could live with the greater pitch, or even have the two pitches like a barn to get the extra overhead.
Steve
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That seems really steep, unless you're in heavy snow country.

Shingles are fairly 'iffy' at _that_ low a slope. You're probably looking at rolled roofing, with a need to seal seams -- or maybe metallic (or Fiberglas) sheeting.
At, say, a 5x12 pitch shingles are "no problem".

Authoritative answer: "It depends". <grin>
Considered in isolation, that pitch is -not- unreasonable for either a "saltbox", or true "shed" style roof. For conventional gable or hip roof designs (and cousins thereof), it _will_ look tend to look 'squished' or 'stepped on', if it's mimicking a conventional structure.
"Geography" also enters into the situation. What "looks normal" in one territory (because it's what 'everybody' does _there_) will look terribly out of place in a different locale. Snow vs. rain is a _big_ consideration, also the degree of variability in storm (and storm winds) directions. So, 'look around' the territory and see what 'other folks' do. :)
A bigger question is what else will be in the field of view -- where will people see it from, and what else will the see with/around it.
If it's going to be 'commonly seen' in the same view as the house, you will likely want to mimic the house architecture.

I (almost) hate to say it, in _this_ group, but you may well want to consider a metal storage shed. That'll get the low roof profile you are looking for (which will help greatly with the 'more discrete' aspect, and much lower maintenance. Incidentally, the fact that it's "pre- finished" makes an amazing difference in the amount of time/effort to project completion. :)
Aside: I was googling a few things related to writing this reply, and came across "www.shedkitstore.com" The site is painfully slow to load, and I know -nothing- about them; they have a substantial collection of various kinds of shed kits, wood, vinyl and metal. In their 'best barn' line (wood) is an 'Elm' model, with about a 4:12 pitch. In the 'arrow' models (metal), they've got some that do not look bad, and that have an about 1:12 pitch.
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They only work if you are under 5' tall. I had one, and poured a slab and put a 2' pony wall to mount the shed on top of.
Steve
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Depends on the structure. _long_ ago, had one from Sears, no less, that had close to 7' internal clearance on the high wall -- just under 6' at the back wall. Door opening was only about 5'9", did have to duck stepping in.
Here's one that is minimum 6' at the walls, and is over 7-1/2' at the ridge- pole. <http://shedkitstore.com/document_product_info.html?products_id#1
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I think you could easily draw that on paper and get a good idea of what it would look like.
On another note, for a few dollars more per sheet you can get radiant barrier decking over standard decking and that will keep you shed considerably cooler in the summer months. Cheap and no more work.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Three things ...
<1> I would avoid a metal shed. Rust and the inability to purchase oil based paint in economical gallons makes it a bad idea in many areas of the USA at least. I live in Pennsylvania and the state government in its infinite wisdom has banned oil based paint sold by the gallon. Best check that out before hand. Oil based spray cans or epoxy are still legal but not very economical/practical.
<2> 8 x 10 is really small. Mine is 10 x 12 and with just a 42" lawn tractor, 21" mower, trimmer, edger, and an assortment of garden tools (including two wheel barrows) its stuffed to the gills. The pull behind cart doesn't fit at all and sits outside at the mercy of the weather.
<3> Gather up everything that will go in the shed and arrange it in the yard. Allow a path to get yourself in to get at whatever is in the back of the shed and then measure the needed floor space. You will be amazed at how much room you really need.
John
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That is like all the tin sheds. Also, I have a slighly bigger shed in mybackyard with a very low pitch like that. The roofing on my shed is some sort of corrugated stuff but much heavier than the typical galv or poly type. It is like 4' x 6' sheets, the corrugation is maybe 3" wide each and he stuff is about 1/4" thick. Kind of structural and enclosure all in one. It might be fiberglass or cementious or something. They have it at home depot.
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There are some heavier, anodized metal sheets out there in a choice of gauges and colors and profiles.They are much pricier than the regular wavy corrugated fiberglass along with being more durable and handsome.
Aside from rain as an expressed design consideration, if other factors allow, the OP might consider a translucent or transparent plastic material on one or both sides of the apex of his roof to allow permanent skylighting. A T-bar ridge of plastic "wood" would protect the joint there as would some of the aluminum ridge material available across a range of greenhouse suppliers.
For plastic panels, Glassteel with a Tedlar coating has an exceptional lifetime. It is available in at least two profiles, the shiplap variety being much more forgiving when it comes to rafter allignment.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
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wrote:

I built one this fall that is slightly larger - 10 x 14. I had some of the same concerns, especially since a smaller shed can end up looking like a church if you use standard studs and such. I wanted it to blend with the house as well as possible and here are a few things I did:
- Used the shorter 86" studs instead of full length. This brought the ridge line down about 6"
- Used the same roof slop as the house - 7:12 in our case. This provided a lot of room for overhead lofts in each end and storage (made shingling fun).
- The house has 2' overhang all around and I used 1' overhang.
- The lower eves of the house have box trim and I copied it.
- Paint scheme is the same.
Even with an 8" door header the shorter studs provide plenty of head clearance for my 5'-11" height. Our 6'-4" son in law will have to duck. Even with the shorter wall heights, the shed looks plenty tall but it is attractive.
RonB
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Building codes in most areas allow you to build a shed up to 100 square feet without a building permit (check with your local building department).
It's easy to build a shed with 2x4 studs and plywood siding. Since plywood sheets are usually 4' wide, this normally means a shed that is 8x12 (96 sq/ft), with 8' high walls. Note that the actual inside ceiling height is typically a little lower as the plywood siding laps over the floor framing or concrete slab to keep out wind, rain, and bugs.

I built mine with a 6/12 pitch. Lower pitches look kind of odd on a tall shed, and you start having to worry about leaks below 4/12 or so. Anything steeper than 6/12 is hard to walk on safely, making construction and maintenance more difficult.

My shed is 8x12, with the 6/12 pitch, making it approximately 10' high at the peak. If it was standing alone out in the open somewhere it may look odd, but situated near our house and trees it looks fine. The eaves of our house are higher than 10' and the ridges are upwards of 18', so the shed size fits nicely.
Anthony
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Thanks all who responded.
I have a 3 car garage that I'd like to organize and if I can get the wood and garden tools out, that would help a lot. One of the stalls in the garage is my workshop - so I'm not using the shed as a workshop.
After I started this thread, the architect who designed our house came by on a unannounced visit. He suggested that I build a small retaining wall (the property is slopped) of about 30 inches, slab it with concrete and then build a 10x12. Of course he would design it for me for $1200 or so. That was funny, I thought!
I'm going to hold back a bit and take look around as to where I could stick this shed and not have it be so obtrusive to the property. The property is narrow, long and slopped, which forces the siting of the shed to specific areas.
Thanks again!
MJ
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On 2/20/2011 2:28 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Thats good, build the shed and you have two stalls for the workshop. Park the car outside, and you have an ideal size workshop:-)

Yeah, my shed cost exactly $1200 when I built it, 25 years ago. I knew the local lumber yards put sheds, and everything needed to build them on sale every spring, so I drew everything up in the winter, and bought all the material when it went on sale. Saved a ton of money.
I built both my sheds on 6x6 Wolmanized posts. My first shed was not on level ground, so the front posts were short, the back posts were longer:-)
--
Jack
You Can't Fix Stupid, but You Can Vote it Out!
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