Sharpening guides or systems for carving tools?

Page 1 of 2  
I'm looking for reviews or recommendations on sharpening guides. I currently have about 20 Dockyard micro carving tools ranging from 1.5mm to 3mm in many different shapes. The manufacturer recommends a 20 angle. These tools are SOOOOOOOOO tiny that I cannot afford to muck them up by being inaccurate. Just a few wrong swipes will completely wipe a blade out. I love them, they hold an edge nicely and though I have run them on my leather strop a little I would like to be able to keep them as nice as when they arrived.
Dockyard recommended their own sharpening jig BUT I am unable to locate it online, even at Woodcraft... which is where the tools came from. Short of finding a phone number I don't know what else to do.
Eventually (hopefully sooner than later) I plan on getting more carving tools in larger sizes. Some good quality tools. I've been using some Chinky China stuff and they were great for getting my feet wet but now I'm ready to make an investment.
Will you guys and gals give me the benefit of your experience, please?
Here are a couple of things I am considering.
http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyidS66 http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyid "4&productidB30 However, the shafts on the micro tools are round. Alignment may be an issue.
and this is the only thing I can come up with for my tools that are not flat http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyidC64 Any suggestions?
Thanks in advance :)
--
Kate
______
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Notoce that the SlipStrop POLISHES. I bought one thinking it was a molded synthetic fine stone. It ain't. It's wood - and a soft wood at that.
The Precision Sharpening System does flat bevels, which is half of what's needed for flat, single bevel, chisels and carving tools - you still need a flat and polished back. This one won't do curved bevels and can't get into the inside.
The Veritas sharpening guide is the older of the two Veritas sharpening guides - and the more difficult to set up. Made for flat tools though you could probably use a triangular file to make a groove in it to hold round things. The groove would have to be sqaure to the ends or you'll get a skewed bevel. Doesn't do the inside of curved or V carving tools though.
I suspect that what you'll end up with is some japanese water stone "slips? - or synthetic stone versions.
charlieb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi Charlie! How ya doin?
Thanks for the input. Believe it or not, I read enough about the slip strop that I knew it was - just a strop. BUT, I'm hoping it will be of use with the polishing of those little curved edges. I use a flat one now but it doesn't do anything for the other shapes.
So... what do I use for thos wee little inside edges and the round and V groove ?
K.
Notoce that the SlipStrop POLISHES. I bought one thinking it was a molded synthetic fine stone. It ain't. It's wood - and a soft wood at that.
The Precision Sharpening System does flat bevels, which is half of what's needed for flat, single bevel, chisels and carving tools - you still need a flat and polished back. This one won't do curved bevels and can't get into the inside.
The Veritas sharpening guide is the older of the two Veritas sharpening guides - and the more difficult to set up. Made for flat tools though you could probably use a triangular file to make a groove in it to hold round things. The groove would have to be sqaure to the ends or you'll get a skewed bevel. Doesn't do the inside of curved or V carving tools though.
I suspect that what you'll end up with is some japanese water stone "slips? - or synthetic stone versions.
charlieb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Kate wrote:

Kate,
There are as many ways to sharpen carving tools, as there are woodcarvers: each has there on method.
To sharpen my small carving tools I use a sharpening stone when the cutting edge becomes rounded from stropping, damaged, or needs to be reshaped, followed by honing. I use the Flexcut Slipstrop with Tormek honing compound.
The following web sites will provide more info on sharpening
Mac Proffits method: <http://www.woodcarvers.com/sharpening.htm
Lora Irish's web site: <http://www.carvingpatterns.com/sharpening-2.htm
The Carvers Companion web site: <http://carverscompanion.com/NewCarverFiles.html
Neil Kate,
There are as many ways to sharpen carving tools, as there are woodcarvers: each has there on method.
To sharpen my small carving tools I use a sharpening stone when the cutting edge becomes rounded from stropping, damaged, or needs to be reshaped, followed by honing. I use the Flexcut Slipstrop with Tormek honing compound.
The following web sites will provide more info on sharpening
Mac Proffits method: <http://www.woodcarvers.com/sharpening.htm
Lora Irish's web site: <http://www.carvingpatterns.com/sharpening-2.htm
The Carvers Companion web site: <http://carverscompanion.com/NewCarverFiles.html
Neil http://www.tristatecarvers.com /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

SNIP
Their own method indeed. With the use of the tool as its own jig is the one most employ. Means nothing coarser than a Washita or fine India is ever used, because coarser takes longer to get the gross marks out by hand than just honing fine to begin with.
Fortunately carving is not done by placing the tool in a jig at a fixed position like a plane or shave. Means there's a _LOT_ of leeway in angles and bevels. Isn't the numbers that make an edge sharp or a carver competent, either. Makes the pursuit of the right number a waste of time and money in my opinion.
But if you must have it, make your basswood ramps at the proper angles and slide them and the tool on your oiled stone. Or straddle the stone with the ramp if you're using water.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
SNIP

Their own method indeed. With the use of the tool as its own jig is the one most employ.
***Ok, this is pretty much what I've been doing. However it seems that my tools are sharp, just not as sharp as I would like them to be.
Means nothing coarser than a Washita or fine India is ever used, because coarser takes longer to get the gross marks out by hand than just honing fine to begin with.
*** I RARELY take one to a stone. The stone I have is a very fine white arkansas oil stone. I'm just afraid I'll round the edges orget the angles all buggered up.
Fortunately carving is not done by placing the tool in a jig at a fixed position like a plane or shave. Means there's a _LOT_ of leeway in angles and bevels. Isn't the numbers that make an edge sharp or a carver competent, either. Makes the pursuit of the right number a waste of time and money in my opinion.
*** ok, that kind of eases the stress out of it. In most cases I wouldn't care but these micro tools have such a micro margin for error I'm hoping to keep them good for as long as I can.
But if you must have it, make your basswood ramps at the proper angles and slide them and the tool on your oiled stone. Or straddle the stone with the ramp if you're using water.
*** Thanks! I never thought of making a wooden ramp!
Kate
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There are as many ways to sharpen carving tools, as there are woodcarvers: each has there own method.
To sharpen my small carving tools I use a sharpening stone when the cutting edge becomes rounded from stropping, damaged, or needs to be reshaped, followed by honing. I use the Flexcut Slipstrop with Tormek honing compound.
<|>I have a little bitty white Arkansas stone that I have been using. Trouble is the angled and rounded edges. I'm doing ok with the straight edges I just hate the thought of messing the different shaped ones up.
Thanks for the links, I'll go do some more homework. I'm planning on getting a couple of the Chris Pye books, the tools and sharpening book is on my list
Kate
The following web sites will provide more info on sharpening
Mac Proffits method: <http://www.woodcarvers.com/sharpening.htm
Lora Irish's web site: <http://www.carvingpatterns.com/sharpening-2.htm
The Carvers Companion web site: <http://carverscompanion.com/NewCarverFiles.html
Neil Kate,
There are as many ways to sharpen carving tools, as there are woodcarvers: each has there on method.
To sharpen my small carving tools I use a sharpening stone when the cutting edge becomes rounded from stropping, damaged, or needs to be reshaped, followed by honing. I use the Flexcut Slipstrop with Tormek honing compound.
The following web sites will provide more info on sharpening
Mac Proffits method: <http://www.woodcarvers.com/sharpening.htm
Lora Irish's web site: <http://www.carvingpatterns.com/sharpening-2.htm
The Carvers Companion web site: <http://carverscompanion.com/NewCarverFiles.html
Neil http://www.tristatecarvers.com /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Kate wrote:

The Slipstrop and the gold honing compound should keep your angled and rounded edges sharp. Just as effective is to use your v and gouge tools to cut grooves in softwood creating a strop to hone the bevel of the matching v tool or gouge. Use a leather shoestring with honing compound to hone the inside bevel of your micro tools.
Another book to consider on sharpening is The Complete Guide to Sharpening by Leonard Lee.
Neil
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Kate wrote:

The Slipstrop and the gold honing compound should keep your angled and rounded edges sharp. Just as effective is to use your v and gouge tools to cut grooves in softwood creating a strop to hone the bevel of the matching v tool or gouge. Use a leather shoestring with honing compound to hone the inside bevel of your micro tools.
** Oh HEY! That's a good idea! Thanks :)
Another book to consider on sharpening is The Complete Guide to Sharpening by Leonard Lee.
Neil
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Kate, I also recently started using the dockyard micro tools and did a similar search to buy or at least get some info on the dockyard sharpening jig. No luck, no email address, no phone number. I do have their street address (printed on their product labels) and I typed up a short letter to them requesting info. The letter is still in my computer. If I eventually mail it and get info I will let you know here. If you get any where, please do the same. Larry

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Kate, I also recently started using the dockyard micro tools and did a similar search to buy or at least get some info on the dockyard sharpening jig. No luck, no email address, no phone number. I do have their street address (printed on their product labels) and I typed up a short letter to them requesting info. The letter is still in my computer. If I eventually mail it and get info I will let you know here. If you get any where, please do the same. Larry
Thanks Larry... I sure will!
How do you like them? I just love mine, they are SO little and precise.
What are you carving?
Kate
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wed, Jan 9, 2008, 9:15pm (EST-1) snipped-for-privacy@behindyourears.selby.ws (Kate) doth wonder: I'm looking for reviews or recommendations on sharpening guides. <snip>
My theory on sharpening guides is, just use them on things like plane irons, that will be staying at the same angle.
Things like turning tools, carving tools, only need to be close as reasonable, because every time you make a cut the angle of the tool to wood is not going to be exactly the same. For my lathe tools I prefer my small benchtop belt sander. I got el cheapo HF tools, because I figured I'd practice with those, and if I screwed them up, no prob, and I'd get quality tools later. Well, still haven't worn the HF tools out yet, so still using them, with no prob. One of these tays tho I'll get around to putting longer handles on them. Haven't sharpened my carbing chisels yet, but probably will be doing them with Scarey Sharp, no guide, rather than the belt sander. Or, maybe the belt sander, depends on how the wind is blowing that day, what the humidity is, temperature, sunny or cloudy, or just whether I feel like it or not. So far, my theory is working out quite well for me. Oh yeah, if I ever replace my lathe tools, it'll be with homemade versions. Now, if I can just get a place to set up a forge.
JOAT 10 Out Of 10 Terrorists Prefer Hillary For President - Bumper Sticker I quite agree.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
(Kate) doth wonder: I'm looking for reviews or recommendations on sharpening guides. <snip>
My theory on sharpening guides is, just use them on things like plane irons, that will be staying at the same angle.
Things like turning tools, carving tools, only need to be close as reasonable, because every time you make a cut the angle of the tool to wood is not going to be exactly the same. For my lathe tools I prefer my small benchtop belt sander. I got el cheapo HF tools, because I figured I'd practice with those, and if I screwed them up, no prob, and I'd get quality tools later.
*** That's where I am now. I have learned a LOT by using the HF tools. Most - no - ALL of them had to have a lot of reshaping to even be useful. Even still they never were satisfactory. Now that I'm ready to invest in some better tools I want to do the best that I can by the edges so I don't bugger them up.
Well, still haven't worn the HF tools out yet, so still using them, with no prob. One of these days tho I'll get around to putting longer handles on them. Haven't sharpened my carving chisels yet, but probably will be doing them with Scarey Sharp, no guide, rather than the belt sander.
*** Scarey Sharp?
Or, maybe the belt sander, depends on how the wind is blowing that day, what the humidity is, temperature, sunny or cloudy, or just whether I feel like it or not. So far, my theory is working out quite well for me. Oh yeah, if I ever replace my lathe tools, it'll be with homemade versions. Now, if I can just get a place to set up a forge.
*** JT - you crack me up. ; Thanks for the advice and the giggle. Oh, put the forge up behind the shop. What the heck, you can shoe horses on the side.
Kate
JOAT 10 Out Of 10 Terrorists Prefer Hillary For President - Bumper Sticker I quite agree.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Kate" wrote

That should be scary sharp.
It is a method of sharpening that uses a progessive series of different grits of sandpaper on a very flat surface, usually glass.
It is a common enough, I am sure therre is lots of info around on it, either on the web or in the wreck archives.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thu, Jan 10, 2008, 10:56am leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net (LeeMichaels) doth sayeth: That should be scary sharp. It is a method of sharpening that uses a progessive series of different grits of sandpaper on a very flat surface, usually glass. It is a common enough, I am sure therre is lots of info around on it, either on the web or in the wreck archives.
If you're gonna get picky about the spelling, I'm gonna get picky about the capitalization - it is Scary Sharp. Actually Scary Sharp (TM). While you were at it you should have given the URL too, so she could have accurate info. http://www.shavings.net/SCARY.HTM
JOAT 10 Out Of 10 Terrorists Prefer Hillary For President - Bumper Sticker I quite agree.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<snip> Thanks for the advice and the giggle. Oh, put the forge up behind the shop. What the heck, you can shoe horses on the side.
Some of the pros sharpen with belt sanders.
Forge behind the shop? Not lately. And I take it you have never shoed a horse. I have helped, and it is NOT something I care repeat. So yuo don't know what Scarey Sharp is? Well for the above, I'm not gonna tell you. Hehehehe But I'm sure someone else will. If you'd made a proper sacrifice or two for the Woodworking Gods I woulda told you. Heathen.
JOAT 10 Out Of 10 Terrorists Prefer Hillary For President - Bumper Sticker I quite agree.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<snip> Thanks for the advice and the giggle. Oh, put the forge up behind the shop. What the heck, you can shoe horses on the side.
Some of the pros sharpen with belt sanders.
** if I used a belt sander on these little guys, they would be gone in the blink of an eye. and you KNOW I'm about as far from being a pro as the get ;)
Forge behind the shop? Not lately. And I take it you have never shoed a horse. **shod... nop, have never shod a horse. Grew up withhorses under my arse, held the twitch while my mom put shoes on them but never did it mysel. Never wanted to either.
I have helped, and it is NOT something I care repeat. So yuo don't know what Scarey Sharp is? Well for the above, I'm not gonna tell you. Hehehehe But I'm sure someone else will. If you'd made a proper sacrifice or two for the Woodworking Gods I woulda told you. Heathen.
**But you DID you DID, in the other post. Funny as hell too. I read a little of it. Will sit and read it all when I get some time this evening. Thanks JT
And, the appropriate sacrifice would be_______ ?
Kate
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Kate wrote:

Oh geez, Kate. NEVER ask. It's either your first born or a case of yellow paint in aerosol cans. Sometimes both.
--
Tanus

This is not really a sig.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sat, Jan 12, 2008, 12:11pm snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (Tanus) doth mistakenly state: Oh geez, Kate. NEVER ask. It's either your first born or a case of yellow paint in aerosol cans. Sometimes both.
Not only a bloody damn heathen, but a bloody damn barbarian also. Among other things, I've got my own first born, and he's enough of a PITA I don't want to take on someone else's PITA. And I buy my own paint. No wonder the Woodworking Gods don't bless you.
JOAT 10 Out Of 10 Terrorists Prefer Hillary For President - Bumper Sticker I quite agree.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

**snip!**
Oh geez, Kate. NEVER ask. It's either your first born or a case of yellow paint in aerosol cans. Sometimes both.
--
Tanus


HEH... If I sent my first born, I could collect a good $um to take her back
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.