Saw Stop

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Joe Bemier wrote:

Any car without seat belts would be more than 30 years old or would have had them removed. While there are some around they are not commonplace and are generally treated as collectables.
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--John
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Older than that, actually. Seat belts have been required equipment (in the front seat, at least) for nearly *forty* years -- since 1968.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Tue, 11 Jul 2006 00:13:04 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net () wrote:

Many states require seat belts and cars cannot be sold without them. If you are not wearing a seat belt, even if they are not present, you will be ticketed and I wouldn't be surprised if a car without them wouldn't be impounded as unsafe on the spot.
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Brian Henderson wrote:

The United States Government requires that seat belts be installed, the states have no say in the matter. But a car made before the seat belt law will not be impounded, there was a grandfather clause.
Further, I believe that the state laws requiring the wearing of seat belts have an exemption for vehicles that do not have them.
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Not quite right. Yes, it's the Federal government that requires the manufacturers to install the belts, not the states -- but states certainly *do* have the say over whether those belts are *used*.

Minor correction: for vehicles that were manufactured without them. I don't imagine you could avoid a ticket just by removing the belts from your late-model car. :-)
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Oh yeah, the last antique car rally I went to, the police were hauling them away in car carriers...
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Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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Fewer personal injury claims. There are different degrees of air bag coverage. The more you have the better. 2 years ago our 2000 VW Passat had air bags front and front side. Our 2004 Accord has Front and front and back side air bags and overhead side airbags. The Honda was a more expensive car by about 10% and our insurance on that car has dropped about $300 per year on that vehicle and there have been no claims or traffic violations in the last 8 years.
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I can see it now. There are two things that could kill you during an accident. Being killed by the impact or from being sqeezed into a thin pencil shape by all the airbags.

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No, I think suffocation. :~)
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<...previous quote snipped...>J. Clarke wrote: <...snipped...>

In a school or training environment, I could probably be persuaded that this was a good idea. But once the insurance companies "realize that there is an option" it's not too far a stretch to see that other tools could utilize this same technology. What happens when insurers mandate that everything from tablesaws to grinders to routers and circular saws are equipped with similar mechanisms? That $3500 multiplied by X might not be so trivial after all.
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Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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I saw a demo at a wood show and they putshed the hot dog in at a really fast feed rate. They operator said he wanted to be able so show at least a small mark on the hotdot so he gave the sled that the hotdog on a real fast jolt forward, way faster then you would ever feed wood. It was a real jolt. The hotdog had a very small nick in the outercasing of the hotdog. It was so small it almost didnt even cut through the outer casing. I imagine if it was your finger you would not have a drop of blood even. It was really amazing.

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You should do a little research before making these assumptions. According to SawStop, wet lumber is not a problem.

A cut is better than an amputation.

SawStop is not supposed to prevent kickbacks. That said however it is one of the few brands that offer a riving knife in the US. You still have to use you head, its still not a good idea to look down a gun barrel even though the gun has a safety.
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The riving knife is for the kickbacks.... not the SawStop mechanism. On that note look up information on kickbacks and riving knives and you will find that they are effective (if you actually use it!).
John
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I was thinking more in terms of what would happen if the kickback would take your hand into the blade, would the mechanism activate fast enough to prevent serious injury.
Mort
John Grossbohlin wrote:

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If a kick back takes your hand into the blade, you're feeding from the wrong end of the saw.

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CW wrote:

Hi
A common result of kickbacks is that a saw operator will reflexively push down on a workpiece that starts to lift off the table (No, I can't quote my source, but OHSA will back me up.). My FIL worked with a very experienced carpenter who did this and rip cut his hand between his 3rd and 4th fingers.
SawStop won't eliminate kickbacks, but it should stop the blade if you push your meaty hand into it.
Play safe drifwood
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This seems unlikely, to say the least -- since kickback moves *away* from the blade.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

According to an article I read the classic injury pattern is that the material being kicked back strikes the operator on the left hand side of their torso causing them to pivot about their right foot bringing their right hand forward and across the blade.
If the object hits you square in the chest then maybe you go backwards. But a glancing blow is going to send you spinning and even if your center of mass is going backwards your body is still moving forwardsl.
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On 10 Jul 2006 11:06:27 -0700, "Phillip Hallam-Baker"

Exactly how do you go across the blade if you're using a blade guard? You'd hit the side of the guard, not the blade. The only real way to hit the blade, assuming you're using the guard properly, is to go from the front, under the guard.
Of course, if you're stupid enough not to use the guard, you deserve what happens to you.
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wrote:

Be careful throwing those rocks. Dado's are impossible on most TS that have the stock blade guard.
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