Router table insert to mount router

Anyone recommend something available that includes the jig or pattern to cut the table top? Thanks
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I got mine from MLCS
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I bought the Rocker aluminum plate (regular size). I am very happy with it. Later I upgraded to the Rockler/Jessem Mast'r Lift. Same size as the first plate, so it was a sweet upgrade. And I am very happy with the Rockler/jessem Mast'r lift.
Dave
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Woodpecker has the lifts, plates and patterns. The patterns run about $10 but you can make your own pattern and use a pattern bit to run around the inside of your patten to finish trim the opening. Check MLCS for a free routing manual but I don't think it covers this. Still, "free" anything is good. Hylton & Matlack wrote a good text, "Woodworking with the Router" and that's a good text to have on hand.
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I haven't tried this one yet, but it looks interesting:
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&pA776&cat=1,43000,51208&ap=1
I'll probably try it soon, since my router has been sticking up through a 2" hole in a particle board top for about 15 years and it's time to move up..
I'm figuring that it must be pretty simple since they offer to provide a new base plate if you follow instructions and still screw it up... YMWV
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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I have this one and like it. Pretty easy to do - instructions were clear and the jig was easy to use. Just make sure to keep the groove it sits in clean and the registration screw and rubber gasket tight - mine works loose. and has fallen out. Haven't lost it though.
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You folks are fantastic! I have been a couple of hours researching names and ideas given me here and decided a course of action.
Great responses I thank you all again!
Kenneth
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I just bought a regular size Rockler aluminum plate, a 3 1/4 HP porter cable router and a 4' x 2' melemine (sp?) shelf. What I did was built a quick template out of plywood.
1: The aluminum plate was something like 11 x 8 (maybe 11 1/4 x 8,) so I measured a router base I had from edge to the straight bit. It was 3 inches, so I made my template a rectangle of 14x11. I clamped the template to the shelf, then and cut out the out a ring that was a smidge over 1/4 inch deep. 1/4 inch is the depth of the Rockler plate. The ring was roughly 3/4 inch wide. Now I had the rabbit that my plate would fit into, but the hole wasn't there yet.
2: I cut out four 3/4 inch plywood strips to fit inside the edges of my template (to make the template a little smaller rectangle.) I dropped the depth of my bit to go through the shelf material and cut out the hole. I think 1/2 inch rabbit would have been perfect (see later.)
3: Check the plate for fit into the rabbit. Where the corners were routed out, a little more material gone than I needed. I used a 1/4" straight router bit, a larger bit would probably route it out perfectly. I don't think it will hinder anything as long as the plate fits nice and tight.
4: I re-enforced the corners of the routed hole with some 3/4 inch oak scraps. I felt that the particle board might not hold up the router with plate over time. To change the bits I pull the router/plate out of the table when necessary.
5: I cut a hole out of my workbench and put in it's place the shelf (or what I now call my "router table top.")
6: The 3 1/4 HP router was a tight fit to the hole, so I had to trim the edges of my router plate hole in a few spots with a jig saw. The 3/4 in groove was a little too much, but a 1/4 inch trim here and there allowed the router to fit properly.
7: Route away!
The router plate doesn't seem to move at all with the weight of the router and a workpiece pressing down on the plate but I might try to do something to actually lock the plate into position. After writing this, I am wondering if the router plate is usually screwed to the table? There doesn't seem to be any way to do this with the Rockler plate. I guess all will be good as long as the plate fits tightly into the rabbit.
More info than asked for, but I hope this helps, Jim
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I had a router plate cut from solid surface counter top material and wound up cutting four boards about 4" wide and making a frame that fit it tightl. Then, with a top-bearing router bit, I cut the rabbit. Then, I used a 3/4" bottom cutting carbide bit to cut out the rest of the opening to the same depth. (I was using a Formica-laminated 1.25" thick MDF Table top that I salvaged from a Subway Restaurant renovation for the router table). Then, I used a spiral up cut carbide 5/16" bit and cirle cutter to remove a circle of material large enough to allow the PC 690 to slip through. I do not believe I will need to fasten the plate to the table, but may want to devise some adjusters to allow leveling the plate with the table top surface.
WHAT I NEED NOW are three of those tracks one installs to hold the fence and lock in accessories (hold downs, etc.) Anyone know where they are cheap?
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