Router Table DC hose placement

I'm midway to finishing my router table and I'm contemplating the placement of the Dust Collection connector hose. I've noticed most tables have the hose attached to the rear of the table (behind the router) but saw a limited few which had the attachment on the bottom (under the router), thus, making me wonder if one has the advantage over the other. Part of my thought leans towards the bottom placement due to the gravity effect. The other part thinks it may not make a difference with a powerful DC system. Therefore, what's the consensus amongst the group?
Thanks
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SBH wrote:

Never seen any that collected all that much; you'll need the hood in the lateral location to keep chips from going off horizontally.
--
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says...

Don't put it where it fights the cooling fan on the router.
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It all depends on what you are doing, cutting groves, noting gets caught. My DC Collector hose is connected directyly to the fence behind the bit opening. Works well when the debris can get through.
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I will also have the hose connected to the fence in addition to the router box exit hose. I'm just wondering if there's an advantage of one over the other.
Thanks
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I find that very little actually goes down inside the cabinet with the hose connected tot he fence. Because routers blow down, up when mounted upside down most the debris stays outside the cabinet. Like a TS you simply cannot contain all of it and a little goes every where. After a routing table run I simply open the cabinet doors and suck out the debris that escaped the fence opening. If you are cutting dado's it is virtually impossible to contain any of the waste.
You can mount a hose in both locations, the fence and inside the cabinet, but I would speculate that the hose in the cabinet will not catch much more than no hose at all. YMMV
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wrote:

I don't know how much it catches, but I know it works great for cleaning off the table after the bit has stopped. I just brush everything with my hand and anything within 2 inches of the opening gets sucked right in. My Triton is pretty well enclosed and has a 1-1/4" port built in. So when the fence is open most of the air is being pulled from the larger opening up top, when the fence is closed it all goes to the lower port.
It also really sucks down on the part which is kind of like having an automatic featherboard.
-Kevin
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My arrangement: http://picasaweb.google.com/contrarian32/Routers#5389276365652311026
Very little dust escapes *unless* I'm routing a dado or some configuration where the dust gets trapped and can only escape horizontally.
Max
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That's how I expect to do mine. Thank you
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I'd use a bucket/trashcan under an open hole in the base cabinet, and a DC collector up top. Most of the waste will tend to come up with the bit upside down in a top like that. Gravity only happenswhen the fast-moving waste stops moving fast. That pretty much doesn't happen within inches of the bit.

Consensus, in THIS group? Har! He make joke!
-- "A patriot must always be ready to defend his country against his government." --Edward Abbey
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I have both. in the fence and I built a pvc shroud that grabs what it can from the shaft of the motor.
When cutting grooves this does the best job below the table. When cutting with the bit in the fence then the normal fence mounted works best.
Neither is perfect. Some will still get kicked out the side.
On 12/19/2010 4:59 PM, SBH wrote:

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On Sun, 19 Dec 2010 14:59:52 -0700, SBH wrote

In my opinion it's is probably more a mater of convention. Rear connection is easier to access and less prone to falling off. Also, with a router table/cabinet a bottom connection would eat up a chunk of drawer storage.
-Bruce
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That's exactly the main reason I wouldn't want to go bottom. I originally had an idea to use it for space whether a drawer or just an open cavity for another router or accessories. But if it provided a better dust removing ability, I would sacrifice the extra storage.
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I have a router table built into my cabinet saw, with a large, adjustable fence that attaches to the saw fence. The dust collection port is a 6" compartment that slants from above the blade to behind the blade. A vacuum attachment is installed on the slanted piece. It works well, but obviously some of the stuff gets out the bottom. I believe it partially depends on how the bit fits with the table insert. Large bits like radius or ogee seem best. Small diameter bits seem to be less effective. At any rate it keeps at least 1/2 or more of the chips off of the floor. Large molding runs, with a big bit probably put 2/3 - 3/4 of the stuff in the vacuum.
Take a look at last month's Fine Woodworking. They featured an table saw router table that had a interesting dust collection system. Dual port with one on the fence and one built into a collection box beneath the table. The lower one collected from a dust or vacuum system and used to routers collection too. Kinda complicated but it looked like it might work well. Made me think I might redo mine some day.
BTW, in spite of having dust collection now, I plan to keep using my shop vac.
RonB
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Yep there are some things a shop vac is better at.
In many cases you will starve a DC with a small sander, the old style Delta band saw port, a single 2 inch router fence port.
You probably won't starve it if you have fence and cabinet makeup.
On 12/21/2010 8:49 AM, RonB wrote:

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Yep there are some things a shop vac is better at.
In many cases you will starve a DC with a small sander, the old style Delta band saw port, a single 2 inch router fence port.
You probably won't starve it if you have fence and cabinet makeup.
On 12/21/2010 8:49 AM, RonB wrote:

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