Router Foot Switch - A Winnah!

A while back I posted a comment about how I set up the electrical connection to my router so as to be able to plug-in a shorted HFT Foot- actuated switch and control the router with it.
At the time, a couple of folks commented to the effect of "Whatever for?"
Well, the latest project requires routing finish edges on sixty or so decorative pickets for the new deck. We have five pattern pieces the wife uses to rough cut the pickets on the BS and I, in turn, use the router table to finish off the edges with a triple-fluted pattern bit.
Well, if I ever needed an excuse to build it or a justification for doing so, this project was it. Pick up a piece, drop it on the table, step on the switch and rout right away. It works perfectly.
You put a three-way switch in series with an outlet and the router. You plug the HFT FS into the outlet and a shorted plug into the HFT FS outlet (where they expect you'll plug in the tool you want to control). Then, when the three-way switch is thrown to "include" the outlet, the foot switch controls the power to the router (tool). (When it is thrown in the other direction, power is sent directly to the router (tool).
If you want to use the FS "normally," simply replace the shorting plug with the tool to be controlled.
BTW, the reason for doing it this way is to reduce the clutter that directly connecting the router to the foot switch entails (extra electrical cable) as well as the ability to toss the FS in the drawer when not in use and have a functional router table without plugging or unplugging anything - just flip the switch and it's on.
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On Thu, 25 Aug 2011 20:06:40 -0700 (PDT), Hoosierpopi

And if one is not inclined to build their own as Hoosier as done, they can purchase an apparatus that essentially does the same thing from Lee Valley Tools. http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p0049&cat=1,240,41065
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Dave wrote the following:

That's good to know. I need an on-off switch for my hobby compressor (no air tank) when I am airbrushing. As it stands now, I have to get up and pull the plug. I like the idea that the foot switch can be underfoot at the spray booth. Thanks.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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wrote:

Are you spraying tans onto nekkid girls during the winter, boy? <wink>
P.S: Put a tank on that puppy. Any old propane tank will work.
-- Knowledge speaks, but wisdom listens. -- Jimi Hendrix
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I have 3 of them, 1 is hooked up to my drill press and another to my lathe. I have to keep my foot on them as soon as I remove my foot the motors stop. Best thing I ever did. My other one is used where ever I need it, mostly on my table saw, but it is an on/off switch. step on it rip the paywood, shut it off at the saw, no ducking and diveing to find the switch after I have the material in place.

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I made that set up for my drill press years ago.. WW

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[elided]

Whew. I don't think I'd advocate making a "shorted plug", for any purpose.
I think you'd be better off cutting the end off[*] the footswitch cord and hardwiring it to the switch-singlton-outlet combo. Switch up, power on to the outlet, switch down, the footswitch is inserted into the circuit. If you need to use the footswitch at multiple stations, get one each - they're not that expensive.
scott
[*] or replace the entire cord from the footswitch to the jbox with appropriately sized type SJ cord. Use a romex clamp on the jbox for strain relief.
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