Rope carving help needed

Page 1 of 2  
I've started on a stereo cabinet in a southwestern style with rope carved sections on each of the four legs, about 12-13 inches worth. Can anyone offer some advice or sources of information? I've googled and checked my personal and local libraries, but there's not a lot available. I've done a little carving and have about 5 chisels, but this will need to look well finished, closer to machine-turned than hand carved. Thanks in advance, Bob
--
Failure is not an option
But it is a possibility
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Try here http://www.rockler.com/ecom7/product_details.cfm?sku 96&filter#929
Bob Schmall wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
message

Thanks, but these legs are 2" wide x 12-13" long.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bob Schmall wrote:

to the lath. The jig holds a router and he turns the lathe slowly while moving the router down the length of the piece
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
check out legacywoodworking.com
I got their DVD demo while at the WW show in CA 2 weeks ago. Awesome. It will do roping and lots of other cool stuff, if your wallet can handle the price of admission. There are about 5 models. From almost affordable to about $5k IIRC.
dave
Bob Schmall wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bay Area Dave wrote:

I ordered that CD online. It is truly impressive what can be done with that system. After getting over a little sticker shock at the price of the unit I really liked (Porsches and Corvettes give me sticker shock as well...), I had a minor sticker shock relapse when I realized the cost of all the router bits which would be required to fully support the machine's capabilities.
Now it is time for some hard choices...do I get a new upscale wood lathe , or one of those Legacywoodworking machines....so many toys...so little time!
Tim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Let's see.... Hmmm, that works out to at least $1,250 per leg. It's real nice wood, but...
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
But, Bob, after the next project, the amortized cost per leg will be a mere $625! two projects after that; a paltry $312.50/leg. And think how much fun it will be to have one of those bad boys in your shop. You most likely will be the first on your block to own one! sigh...if only I were made of money...
dave
Bob Schmall wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David, I AM made of money, but it's all pennies.
Bob

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

;)
--
be safe.
flip
Verso l'esterno! Verso l'esterno! Deamons di ignoranza.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'll bring the penny wrappers; I'll help you haul it to the bank...for a percentage, of course.
dave
Bob Schmall wrote:

snip
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 15 Nov 2003 23:13:47 GMT, "Bobby Schmally" brought forth from the murky depths:

Get thee to a Leebrary and find Mike Burton's "Architectural Carving: Techniques for Power & Hand Tools" and/or anything by Onians or Pye. You need to double grind your chisel or use an incannel for rope. Sanding will help it achieve(?) that lovely "canned" look.
---------------------------------------------------------------- * OPERA: A Latin word * Wondrous Website Design * meaning * Save your Heirloom Photos * "death by music" * http://www.diversify.com ----------------------------------------------------------------
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks, Larry. I found www.mountainwoodcarvers.com where there is a boatload of books. I'll also check the library.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have put a sketch on ABPW showing how I would do it . It can be done using a saw and rasps if necessary ,carving tools would be preferred but certainly not necessary...mjh
-- mike hide

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks, Mike. I printed it out. Actually I was fooling around last night after posting the message and tried something like what you suggest. My neandersawing technique needs work, but carving the half rounds produced something almost decent.
Bob

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I did some rope carving for a SW hall table, and the source I found invaluable is the book _Spanish Colonial Furniture_ by A.D. Williams. He gives an illustrated description of layout and cutting by hand.
I haven't looked at Mike's site yet, but Williams' technique involves dividing the legs into equal sections, laying out diagonals, connecting those diagonals so they "candycane" up the leg, sawing to depth at the diagonals, and then using chisels, rasps and whatever you have on hand to smooth out and soften the curves.
It is very time/labor-intensive, but was quite a bit of fun.
You can see pics on my website:
http://www.swt.edu/~cv01/swtable3.jpg
Chuck Vance
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Whoa! You been peekin' at my plans, Vance? The base of the stereo cabinet will have legs very similar to those. Thanks for the input. Now all I need to decide is whether to use a half-round or just a standard curved chisel.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I would suggest a curved one instead of the half round . If you use a half round remember one part of the cut will be with the grain the other against it .However sharp the gouge there will inevitably be some tearout.
Using the curved gouge you can alternate the cutting direction so you always cut with the grain . Sometimes for final accurate cleanup I make a scraper out of scrap metal . I this case I would a scraper with the shape of the intersection of two half rounds [like a vee but with curved sides if you get my drift ] with this type of scraper you can do both sides of the rope carving and manipulate it so you are always scraping with the grain ....just a thought.
-- mike hide

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And another set of thank yous goes out to Mr. Hide, with oak leaf clusters.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bob Schmall wrote:

You're welcome, Bahb. Mike has already given you good info on the tools of choice (especially the idea of using a custom scraper; I wish I had done that early on in the process). I'll just mention how I went about it. I used left and right skew chisels (I re-shaped them from standard yellow-handled Stanleys) to create the V shapes/meet up with the saw cuts on the faces. As Mike said, you *will* wind up going against the grain, but the skews helped minimize chipout (a *real* problem on pine, btw).
Once you get the face grooves cut, you need to make the transitions around the corners. I played around with various chisels and gouges, and had the best success with matched left/right skew spoon gouges. But even that left some rough areas. What I did after that was take some small needle-files to clean up those areas. (In retrospect, a scraper would have been even better.)
This is hard to put into words, but, in general, I found that you will not have much luck at all if you try to approach those wraparounds by going down the center of the groove (unless you are using a scraper, and even then it might be a bit iffy). You will want to approach everything from the face of the work towards the center of the groove; always skewed and alternating working from either side towards the corner.
It's tedious work, but well worth it, IMHO (assuming that's the look you're after). It also taught me more about grain direction change than all of my previous flat projects combined. :-}
BTW, do try to get your hands on that book I mentioned before (A.D. Williams' book). It's got a bunch of nice SW-style projects with pretty detailed drawings, plus some photos, and some excellent descriptions of carving techniques. Sadly, I don't expect it is still in print, but you might be able to get it via ILL.
Chuck Vance
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.