Right Tilt vs Left Tilt

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Rockler is running a sale on a Jet Cabinet Saw right now. Good price, but it is a Right Tilt Saw. What are the pros and cons of having either. I'm running a Royobi BT-3000 right now and want to upgrade to a better saw. The $700 is right in my price range, but I want to get the most for my money. I use the saw mainly for furniture and home improvement projects. Any input and suggestions will be greatly appreciated.
Steve
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I won't try to tell you about the right-tilt vs. left tilt {subliminal message: get a right tilt get a right tilt). There are so many arguments that have been documented on this issue {get a right tilt get a right tilt} and if you DAGS you will find much to sway you {don't listen to the doofuses that think a left-tilt is "safer" - you can cut off your thumb on either saw just as easily - get a right tilt get a right tilt}. What I will tell you is that, even on sale, a $700 saw is very unlikely to be a cabinet saw {even if it isn't get a right tilt get a right tilt}. You're probably talking about the Jet Supersaw, which is more of a hybrid between a cabinet and contractor saw, but the power level, IMO, puts it on the "wuss" side of cabinets or the "balls out" side of contractors {get a right tilt get a right tilt}.
Anyway, I'm sorry I can't tell you what my opinion about the right vs. left issue is, it's just too controversial.
Mike

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I
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Steve,
Here is my subliminal message {look at the Grizzly 1023 before you by the Jet supersaw}. Right versus left is your preference.
Montyhp

but
I'm
money.
input
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On Sat, 14 Feb 2004 21:58:29 GMT, "Mike in Mystic"

Very wise of you to not inject yourself into the left tilt/right tilt debate.
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One production cabinet shop I worked in (about 25+ years ago) had a right tilt, and a left tilt side by side for lead work. Both types have their place but the preference seemed to be for the left tilt saw. My own personal preference? Left tilt. Personal saw?...uhhh...right tilt....
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Normal people get a right tilt.
I had a BT3000. Then I got a Cabinet saw. What a change. I wished I did it right the first time. The challenge is to sell your 3k, with a straight face.
John
Steve wrote:

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As opposed to those that know better? ;~)
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I've owned both, current saw is a left tilt.
Left tilt: Pros - Better bevel ripping, tilt wheel is on right side (I'm right handed), more storage under right side of saw, I find it easier to tighten arbor nut.
Cons - Rip fence scale changes with different blade and dado thicknesses, motor cover may interfere with sliding table, compound miter cuts should be made with right slot.
Right tilt:
Pros - rip cursor doesn't change when blade does, motor cover dosen't interfere with sliding table installation.
Cons - funky bevel rips, tilt wheel on left side, arbor nut on wrong side for me, less storage under table board, due to motor cover and possibly DC connection.
You'll learn to work with either! <G>
Barry
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powermatic (ever heard of them?) got it right the first time. left tilt.

I kept my BT. it makes a pretty good jobsite saw. hauling the powermatic 65 around isn't something I want to try....
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;~) The single most asked question in this group that I paste this rubber stamp answer to.
Both saws will make all the same cuts. Some easier on the left tilt, some easier on the right tilt. Strictly personal preference. But if you need to be steered one way or the other,
Advantages:
Are you right handed?
Get the left tilt.
1. Left tilt has the bevel wheel on the right side and is easily turned with your Right hand.
2. Left tilt can rip a narrow bevel with out having to move the fence to the left side of the blade.
3. Left tilt allows the blade arbor nut to be removed with your right hand.
4. Left tilt allows your to remove the arbor nut and turn it in the direction that you would expect.
5. With a Left tilt, when both edges of a board are beveled, the sharp point of the bevel is up on the fence when cutting the second bevel as opposed to the bottom of the fence where it might slip under.
6. RIGHT tilt if you are left handed. The bevel wheel is on the left side of the saw.
7. RIGHT tilt if you "must" use the fence distance indicator when using a stacked dado blade set. The blades stack left, away from the fence. The indicator remains accurate. On the left tilt, the blades stack towards the fence and makes the indicator inaccurate. In this case use a tape measure to set the fence distance.
8. RIGHT tilt allows you to remove the arbor nut with your left hand but the nut must be turned clockwise to loosen. Bassackwards to normalcy.
If considering a cabinet saw, with wide 50" rip capacity.
The Left tilt will most often afford you the most storage room under the right table extension. The RIGHT tilt has an access door in that location that will demand room to open. The left tilt allows you to have access to the motor and or the insides of the cabinet from the more open left side of the saw with out having to crawl under the right extension table. Very nice if you ever happen to drop the arbor nut inside the cabinet.
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It was this same text Leon posted around a year ago and I made my decision based on it based on being a right hander. I got the left tilt and am getting more used to it all the time. My first saw was right tilt and this one seemed odd for awhile. The only thing I didn't consider that I really don't like is that the miter slot on the left side of the blade is further away than with a right tilt and I'm not as comfortable with it.
Don

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this
Well I hope you are not unhappy with your decision. I was not aware that the slots differed between the right tilt and left tilt as both of my TS's have been left tilt. But since you have mention this I will add this to the things to consider in my rubber stamp reply.
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On Sun, 15 Feb 2004 03:35:52 GMT, "Leon"

==========================================================I honestly had to get off my "arse" and walk out to the shop and actually check for myself ..... As I said in my first reply I own both a right and a left tilt saws...
At least on my two saws (Jet and Delta) the original poster is correct the miter slot closer to the blade in both cases is away fromt he direction the blade tilts.... The left slot is closer on a right tilt saw and the right slot is closer on the left tilt saw...
Had to laugh at myself however because the newer of the saws is over 10 years old now...and I NEVER noticed the difference ..Honest I never did.
So I guess for some it would make a difference...Personally since I never noticed (or if I did notice it sure never reqistered in my brain) It does not make a difference...
When I use a miter gauge I tend to use the gauge in the slot to the right of the blade... on either saw... just never noticed that difference...
Bob Griffiths
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I think the slot orientation is one of those subtle differences that falls in my group of why or why not to get a particular tilt saw. My list focuses more on the way a saw may fit you personally vs. its ability to do what it is suppose to do.
I will say though, and this has been brought up in the past, perhaps by you. The left tilts tend to be better when ripping bevels with the same orientation on opposite sides of a board as the wide side of the bevel is up off the table vs. laying on the table surface. With the long side of the bevel up off the top, the point of the bevel presses against the fence rather than trying to slide under the fence. This is assuming that the piece you are cutting is to wide to be cut on the left side of a right tilt saw.

decision
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No, I don't regret the decision for a number of reasons. The main one being that I do all blade changes from the front of the saw and it seems correct now. I'll get used to the miter slot being further away from the blade. I thought something was different and couldn't really put my finger on it until I put my tennoning jig in the slot and it didn't reach the blade. Read the directions and sure enough, there were instructions on how to change the bar assembly for left tilt saws. I'm sure it's just as accurate, it's just in my head that the further from the blade the slot is, the less stability exists in that distance. My Osborne EB-3 adjusts the difference without a problem.
Don

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There is a slight advantage to a left tilt. With most cabinet saws the fence can be moved more to the right of the blade. Having the blade top tilt away from the fence prevents binding better than if it were tilted toward the fence. So if you are ripping a panel with a bevel, that's where the left tilt is better. This situation is probably not too common.
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Hey Steve,
There is some pretty good posts about your question. I've got a General 650 Left Tilt. My only reason for the left tilt, was easy access to the motor (actually, all components)and dust chute. The access door is located on the opposite side of the extension table, which means, no crawling under the extension table....for adjustments or clearing a clogged dust chute.
Cheers,
Andy
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that later ... BUT I happen to own and use 2 Table saws One is right tilt the other is left tilt...
The difference...absolutely none !!!!! <<<<<<<<<<<<< This is from a retired guy who has been a serious woodworker for 40 or so years !!!
The so called saftey issue is (left being safer) is just a big pile of crap...(no other way for me to say this )...
I will however recommend the left tilt saw IF you plan on using a lot of sheet goodls like plywood to build cabinets and have the need to make plenty of bevel rip cuts that will be visible on the finished cabinet... THE ONLY REASON is that when using a left tilt saw the GOOD side of the plywood would be cut facing up on the saw...thus avoiding the problem of chip out .... however you can swap the fence to the left of the blade on a Rigfht Tilt saw and have the exact same setup and avoid the problem....
I happen to change blades a lot...and use a stacked dado blade a lot and the right tilt allows me to switch blades without playing with the cursor on the rip scale on my Fence... So a right tilt just saves me time...
Others will mention the position of the clean out box and thje location of the hand wheels to raise and lower or tilt the blade... Again since I own both types of saws I honestly see no big difference in actual use...
I am however Curious on just what model of the Jet Cabinet Saw is on sale for 700 bucks... Just sounds like a completely unrealistic price for any Cabinet saw...even the Grizley Cabinet saw is sold for 800 or so ....
Bob G.
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Bob, Jet makes a smaller 110 volt cabinet saw. That is the one on sale at Rockler.
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Leon wrote:

I've looked at the saw before I bought my JTAS-10. The JWCS-10A is a hybrid, more like a contractor's saw in a box. The trunnion assembly is similar to that of a contractor's saw. If you've noticed Jet's model numbers the contractor saws have a "CS" designation and the cabinet saws use "AS".
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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