Reliable Straight Edge?

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says...

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Exactly my point Larry. Which meant that a truly straight edge was never possible on a consistent basis. And sometimes the available wood in the field didn't have a factory edge since it was left over from something else, so there isn't a "reference edge" to correct the guide to.
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Well, I guess you could pop a chalk line and clamp it to that.
says...

right
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Another great tip!
One thing this conference has taught me quickly - be bold with your imagination, drills, saws, and hand tools - build it, modify it, or tear it to pieces to get what you really need.
Bob
says...

Your
think
for
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Check the saw guide from Penn State Industries. I think you can get it from Amazon also. Its an angle aluminum thing with a carriage that you clamp/screw to your saw. It runs on roller bearings. Looks nice, ~$100.
Chris
--
Chris Richmond | I don't speak for Intel & vise versa

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John Doe wrote:

The best would be a Starrett precision straight edge.
Starrett 308-48 48" non beveled - approx. $170 Starrett 308-72 72" non beveled - approx. $300
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA
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John Doe wrote:
<snip>

For most woodworking purposes the factory edge of a piece of plywood is straight enough. Take a look at this jig, which is simple to make:
http://www.benchnotes.com/Skillsaw%20Guide/skillsaw_cutting_guide_boa.htm
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA
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Years ago I had a metal shop make some out of 10 gauge stainless. They are about 4 inches wide with a half inch bent up on one edge in a L shape. I run the tools along the bent up edge. It also works great for picking them up. I bought a 2, 4, 6 and 8 footer. They have had a lot of use and work great. If I did it again I would skip the 6 footer.
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In rec.woodworking

You have to forgive me because I'm a natural born smart ass. May I ask WHY you purchased this and then called it a piece of garbage? Didn't you realize it in the store?
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A couple of good responses to this already, but I will give and answer that sounds smart-assed, but is really serious: How straight, and how much are you willing to pay? Straight-edges for 8-ft lengths can vary from an mdf shelf from the BORG to a machinists straightedge, with tolerance of .0005"per foot, for about $500, and I'm sure you can go up from there.
I seldom need anything straighter than the edge of a sheet of ply or mdf shelf in an 8' length. And I don't consider it an heirloom tool for future generations! <g>
--
Alex
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John,
I bought the same saw guide at the BORG and had the same problem you did with the bowing in the middle. I liked the idea of the sawboard, so I combined the 2.
I took a nice wide 8'+ piece of MDF (3/4" stock) and screwed the Johnson guide to it. It's straight now and won't be going anywhere.
If I'm cutting a lot of pieces for a shelf or something, instead of using my ruler or combo square to set up the saw guide, I cut 3 scrap pieces of wood to the appropriate length. Clamp them to the board you want to cut (bottom, middle and top), butt the sawguide against these pieces, clamp and cut.
Perfect results everytime.
Chuck

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WoodChuck34 wrote:

Chuck, for many cuts it worthwhile to make a saw board wider than the shelf or piece you are cutting with a full length cleat on the bottom side. Hook the cleat over the end of the panel, clamp the sawboard in place and cut.
saw space =============================================================== width of cut piece =====
I've cut over 50 pieces with the 17.25 inch one I made out of particle board and it's still going strong.
Here's the original idea, one of the best woodworking ideas I've found on the web http://members.aol.com/woodmiser1/sawbd.htm
Add a cleat to the bottom and it's good enough to use as a production cutting tool. No measuring and only one thing to clamp to your sheet goods.
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