Re: What is it? XLVI

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* Matthew Newell

A signal lamp? For boats or road workers.

255 shoemaker's tool?
256 a sewing machine?

A bottle opener?

Or a cloth cutter (aka scissors).

A silencer?
--
Jon Haugsand
Dept. of Informatics, Univ. of Oslo, Norway, mailto: snipped-for-privacy@ifi.uio.no
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On Thursday 27 Jan 2005 9:39 am, R.H. scribbled:

Hey I finally get one:
#257, bottle cap opener. My parents used to have one. At least, that's what we used it for.
--
Luigi
Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email
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I don't think it's for an electronic instrument, but the rest of your answer is correct.
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My husband *thinks* that it may be part of a specialized adjustable plane. More than that he's not venturing.
Barb
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wrote:

Nope, it isn't any type of plane.
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In article
It's a bottle opener, for those of us who remember caps that weren't twist-off.
djb
--
"The thing about saying the wrong words is that A, I don't notice it, and B,
sometimes orange water gibbon bucket and plastic." -- Mr. Burrows
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wrote:

Correct.
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New what is it question.
I bought a meat fork at a yard sale. It also came with a knife. The fork has two tines. Both items have nice bone or antler handles. They look like they are probably fifty years old.
On the meat fork, there is a folding thingus just up from the handle. It moves ninety degrees. It is wishboned shape just like the meat fork. It folds up or down. When folded down, it lays along the handle. When folded up, it is at a ninety to the handle. When it is folded up, you can sit the fork down, and the two points of the wishbone and the end of the horn handle keep the two tines off the surface you sit it on. This is the only use I can think of for the moveable piece.
Is that what it is used for, or does the piece have another/other uses?
Steve
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This is what it is for, to keep the fork off of the tablecloth...
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wrote:

That's what it's for.
Barb
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SteveB wrote:

Known as a guard rest, offers protection from the knife and as you surmise, a rest for the fork.
Tom
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I am amazed once again at the things that I can learn here. Thanks for the info. My MIL and I were just discussing it. She is 86, and didn't know what it was for either. I figured something that old, that she would surely know.
I love usenet.
Steve

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snipped-for-privacy@cox.net writes:

If it's like ours, it's far older than 50 years. Ours was given to us by my husband's mother; it had been passed down to her from her grandmother. I'd be curious as to what yours looks like. Do you have photos?
Glenna
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Hi, Glenna Rose.
Sounds similar to the one my mother has. Sometimes, if you have an awkward shaped piece of meat, such as a whole ham, it's easier to carve taking horizontal slices, rather than the more usual vertical ones. To do this, most right-handed people would stab the fork in horizontally from the left, hold it in their left hand, then carve towards it from right to left with the knife. In this situation you are working the cutting edge towards your left, and if the knife slips, it's apt to ride up the fork and be guided by it straight into your left hand.
If you hinge up the little guard, it will stop the knife reaching your hand in the event of a slip.
HTH
Frank
writes:

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Very well put but ever since I read it everything I look at is red!!
Maryann
"Anything can be anywhere!"
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    [ ... ]

    Look at the back. There should be a 3/8" hole in the center.
    Loosen the three black screws (only one shows in the photo, to the right of the lock tab). The counter will lift off. Then you should be able to lift the knob free of the back. You will find room in the back of the knob to accommodate the 3/8" diameter mounting bushing of a potentiometer, a flat washer, and a thin nut -- the kind normally used for mounting pots and rotary switches on old electronic equipment.
    Now -- in the back of the knob should be a 1/4" hole, and there should be two setscrews at the back of the knob (probably hidden by the skirt) which can be tightened by a long skinny Allen wrench to lock the knob onto the 1/4" shaft of the potentiometer.
    When the knob is mounted on the shaft, turn it fully CCW. Reach into the back of the counter mechanism, and turn the gear there until the counter reaches zero, slide it back onto the base with the screws passing into the slots in the skirt, and tighten the screws. At this point, your knob should read "000" with the pot fully CCW, and some value when the pot (it should be a 10-turn one) fully CW. Ideally, it should read "999", but based on your counting the turns vs digits, it probably won't. (Unless you were determining a full turn by a visible hole for a setscrew, and missed the fact that there are two at about 90 degrees separation in the knob.
    I *have* used this kind of knob, though more recently I have mostly used the more shallow versions which I described in my last quoted paragraph above. IIRC, the photographed style, I last saw in *new* use around 1960, used to build things like temperature controllers for test ovens for semiconductors which had to meet tight specs.
    If you have no future need for it once the contest is over, I might be interested in acquiring it from you. I have not seen that style for a long time.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
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(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
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259 Hand Cuff Key
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Correct.
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This one isn't a lamp.

Nope
Not part of a sewing machine

Correct
Sharpener was right.

Not a silencer.
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* R. H.

My children thought it was a lego man helmet. (But I think it is too big, and I cannot figure out the release/open like handle at the bottom.)
--
Jon Haugsand
Dept. of Informatics, Univ. of Oslo, Norway, mailto: snipped-for-privacy@ifi.uio.no
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