Re: What is it? CII


R.H. - The blowhorn stake should never be used in the hardy hole of the anvil. Putting a tapered square shape in the hardy hole then hammering on it could snap off the heel of the anvil. This stake is used in a stump or in a stake plate mounted in the surface of a workbench. Hardy tool tangs are of a size that match the hardy hole and rest flatly on the surface around the hole, not applying pressure to the inside corners.
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wrote:

Yes. Used by telephone installers on the drop wire from the pole to the house.
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LDC wrote:

Yep, very handy. I use mine for slitting open all types of multiconductor cable.
There's an adjustment to control cutting depth, you can use it on two thickness' of cable without further adjustment, and to top it off you can easily remove the blade for sharpening. Found mine in a pawn shop about 22 years ago and I'll never get rid of it. Don't know of a source of supply though. ;(
dennis in nca
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I don't see an adjustment to control cutting depth on mine, it has a round blade that is held in place by a single screw. Though the tool is not symetrical and does cut deeper on one side.
Rob
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589 Keyhole cover. Don't remember where I saw them, but they hang on a screw above a keyhole, hanging down by gravity. Push to one side to insert key.
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Nahmie
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Norman D. Crow wrote:

Yer dead on! I submitted that one. I picked it up from a trash heap behind a hardware store (ironmongers?) in England about 30 years ago.
They were used to keep the Butler from seeing what he shouldn't see. <G>
Jeff
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Jeff Wisnia wrote:

We still use them on outer doors to protect the lock from windblown crud, and to keep the draught out!
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Not to dispute the experts, but ... The (few) keyhole covers I saw were much thinner than this. This pic looks a lot like the things my grandmother had on the ends of the cords for her venetian(sp?) blinds.
Art

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Wood Butcher wrote:

Well, mine is flat unglazed ceramic on the backside, with a sharp edge on the hole, so I 'spect it's truly a keyhole cover.
I'd imagine a drawstring pull would be glazed all over and have radiuses at both ends of the hole.
Jeff (Bucking for a bit part on CSI....)
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On Fri, 17 Feb 2006 11:59:46 -0500, Jeff Wisnia wrote:

2 5/8" long? That's some BIG keyholes!
But, alas, nowhere near big enough for a knob of any kind. (except on an oscilloscope, but that's OT. ;-) )
Thanks, Rich
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Rich Grise writes:

These are keyholes for warded locks, not cylinder locks. The hole has to be big enough for the wards to fit through, and is typically on the order of 1/2 inch high. The widest part is the shaft hole that someone might look through, which from memory I would say is around 3/16 inch in diameter. And the hole in the cover plate is often made larger than the internal hole in the lock mechanism.
As to the cover, you want it to work so that when you push it aside to use the keyhole, you push more or less horizontally and only a little upward, so it swings back but not too readily. To implement that, the cover is pivoted at a point some little way above the actual hole. See:
http://www.antiquehardware.com/images/products/70038909-lg.jpg
http://www.historichouseparts.com/images/VH0324-02.JPG
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589 is one of those little covers for keyholes to stop the draught getting in. Our old house had them on every door
ally
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    Hmmm ... that makes sense. Use it for stripping the outer jacket from Romex wire?
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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My paternal grandmother had a dug well at her house and I have one under my kitchen. I wouldn't take water from the one under my kitchen, but it has a cool beehive-shape top that shows some fairly impressive bricklaying skill went into it.
My wife's grandmother drew water from her drilled well using a bailer almost until her dying day at 90+. I drew water with a bailer from a drilled well at my maternal grandmother's place. She wouldn't hear of having city water. I think she thought the treatment chemicals were slow poisons. But, then, she also thought all unused electric receptacles had to be covered so the electricity wouldn't leak out and "do who knows what to us." She refused to have an electric pump in her well because she thought the electricity would somehow make the water unhealthy.
Strange ideas to be sure, but quite a few old folks held similar opinions about "those new-fangled things that are just made so people can be lazy."
I remember going with my cousins to a store in Barton, OH to get a gallon jug of "coal oil" for lamps for an elderly lady who would have nothing whatever to do with anything electrical. She always put in a few cents extra for candy to pay us for going.
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I've got a couple of other minor changes that I'm thinking about, I'll add your idea to the list, though I haven't yet decided if I'll implement any of them.
Thanks for the re-post.
Rob
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    At least, please consider adding a *very* visible bar -- say a black and yellow diagonal striped bar -- separating the new puzzle photos from the display of the previous week's.
    Alternatives would be to change the background color for the area displaying the last week's puzzle photos -- or make it necessary to click a link to see them.
    It currently really looks too much like a continuation of the puzzles, and many who don't come buy every week make the mistake of answering the ones which have already been answered.

    You're welcome.
    Thanks for the continuing supply of puzzles.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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I'll keep my eye out for a visible bar that will look good on my site, but until then I'll leave a good deal of space between the two latest posts.

The reason that I keep the previous week's post on the front page is so that new visitors will see a wider range of objects. Some posts have tools for all six items, so the second set will hopefully contain something that will appeal to a larger number of people.
I did find something that I was going to use as a separator between posts, but instead I decided to include it as one of the puzzles, it will be the last entry in this week's post. It's a little different than what is usually seen on my site, so depending on what kind of response it generates, I may or may not continue with similar puzzles.
Rob
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Thanks for the info, I have noticed that I don't get any hits from China but I never thought that it might be banned by the government. Part of me would like to think that my site is too subversive for them but I'm guessing that all blogspot sites are blocked from the general public.
Rob
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