Re: What is it? #132


768 ... looks like a tool for sharpening and cleaning the end of (metal) tubes, i.e. for soldering. or, maybee, for cleaning the inner of water taps, the seating of the rubber washer (ooops, right words?). the sliding cones are to fit to different diameters.
771 ... handgrenade? ... boooommm ... it IS not a handgrenade, it WAS a handgrenade ;-)
772 ... the hook is used to pull burning material, or to pull persons out of the fire ??? the 5:00 - 11:00 looks like the mouth of the "waterjet" (oops, right words again?)
please forgive my bad english
guessing greetings from germany chris
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768 Hose bibb/faucet seat cutter. Use to recondition the seat on washer style faucets.
770 Dashpot of some type? (small spring loaded shock absorber)
771 Round and that color of green? I'm guessing little medical oxygen tank.
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    For fitting over the threads on a faucet which has a bonnet type of cap (the older style) to hold it on and concentric to guide the shaft of the reamer.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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I think it was snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com (DoN. Nichols) who stated:

You're RIGHT about that! . . . I think. ;^)

That was my first thought, except I was thinking of a wire-wrap *removal* tool. Ghads, I've wrapped and removed a lot of wires in my younger days . . . .
--
"What do *you* care what other people think?" --Arline Feynman

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Yup. Extraction, methinks.

Nope. A wire-wrap "un-wrapper" has a spiraled slot in the tip that this thingy doesn't have. You were right on the first take . . . .
--
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Sure could be an un-wrapper, I have several that aren't the spiral kind, basically have either a flt or a couple 'pokey' thing in there to catch the wire end, classic one was on the old OK TOOLS WSU-30.

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    They *all* (which I used) had a three-pronged reverse spiral tip to catch the end of the wrapped wire and start it loose. Some had a collar around that to keep the wire from forming too big a tangle. But all of those either had a hexagonal shaft or knurling on the handle to give you a grip to rotate it in operation.
    *This* item is designed for pushing only -- note the multiple grooves turned into it for a non-slip grip in that direction. -- it is a sleeve which goes into a Molex connector to depress the two or three barbs which normally lock the crimped terminal in the connector body, and an internal moving (and spring-loaded) piece to kick the pin out of the connector body, so you don't have to be pulling on just the right wire to get it out.
    I've used both tools many times, and own examples of both.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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And here I've always pulled on the wire and used a screwdriver or needle-nose to compress the barbs...
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