Re: Interesting Joint

wrote:

In English timber-framing practice, this is an edge-halved scarf joint.
It's typically regarded as mid-14th to mid-16th century work. Before this a splayed scarf joint was used, afterwards a face-halved scarf joint. All three are widely seen and are a valuable means of dating old timber-framed buildings.
For the splayed scarf, (the mating faces are sloped, and in two parallel planes. It's locked by a rectangular peg (or pair of wedges) knocked into the gap between the two steps in the sloped faces. They're hard to lay out. and take a while to cut because it's a sloped-grain surface. After the Black Death had killed 1/4 of the population, there was need for a simpler joint that the surviving carpenters could have cut by unskilled labourers.
The face-halved scarf is even simpler to cut. Imagine turning the large flat surface by 1/4 turn, relative to those stopped mortices. Now the whole thing can be marked on a single face and sawn out without chiselling into a stopped corner. The face-halved joint is much less strong (it's still strong, but only in one direction) but it can be made by even less skilled carpenter's labourers.
A couple of weeks ago I was at Cressing Temple barns in Essex. These are a pair of 13th century timber framed barns and show both styles of halved scarf joint. Pretty long timbers too - some are over 40' in one piece.
--
Smert' spamionam

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 28 May 2004 01:19:41 +0100, Andy Dingley

http://www.e-gfl.org/e-gfl/activities/intranet/teacher/history/cressing/tudors/default.htm Still looking for a picture of the beams/construction, but the exterior is impressive, too.
http://www.zenzero.com/mystery/cone.html
Another turning mystery. Can you answer the question he poses? <g>
- Yea, though I walk through the valley of Minwax, I shall stain no Cherry. http://diversify.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<sigh> Your post got me Googling for images of TF joints. Very inspiring. I really want to timberframe one day. Maybe my next shop...
Thanks for the post, -Mike

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.