raised panels


From what I understand verticle panel raising is easier and safer than doing it with a large 3+" horizontal panel raising bit. Other than making a good solid tall fence is there any reason to re-consider doing them horizontally? I have a 2 1/4" bosch router and a table for it.
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doing
horizontally?
Plenty of panels are raised on router tables. Slow your router down for the big cutters. Obviously, with a router you can achieve more than just a simple 15 degree bevel. Often, that's desirable. Style and rail mating is easier as well, since the cutters provide proper contours, and actually a better amount of glue surface - though I'm not sure how much real value that is. Certainly more is better, but like everything else there is a point of diminishing returns. Doweled or M/T joinery offer plenty of strength and stability for the intended purpose. Likewise with the safety aspect. Properly used, how much more unsafe is a router than a table saw? Lots of noise from time to time about "3 in whirling cutters", but beyond the rhetorical value of such statements, the router has an admirable record of providing safe and efficient woodworking.
Don't know if I really answered your questions...
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I was refering to verticle panel raising bits in a router table as opposed to horizontal panel raising bits in a router table.
verticle http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&p0115&cat=1,46168,46178&ap=1
horizontal http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&p0136&cat=1,46168,46178&ap=1

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For 1 1/2 wide areas, you could use vertical, though I find referencing to a broader table versus the fence easier. I use my jointer hold downs to both reference and feed that way instead of featherboards or pressure rollers to reference that I still have to feed around.
Now if you're going for wider detail on the edges, you have to go horizontal.
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mark wrote:

An alternative is to use the verticle panel raising bit in a horizontal router table like the one near the bottom of this page:
http://christophermerrill.net/ww/shop/SimpleRouterTable.html
--

FF


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As apposed to ten inch whirling cutters (tablesaw).
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On Sat, 4 Feb 2006 09:19:38 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

I once had a woodworking store salesman tell me that if a 3" bit's shaft was turning 15,000 RPM, the edge was turning 40,000 RPM. A planetary geared bit, I guess?
I agree. If treated with the same respect as a table saw, a router table (or shaper) can be perfectly safe, regardless of the size of the bit.
Barry
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If you are spinning 3" bits a larger router is desirable. Actually it is easier to make curved cuts when using a horizontal bit vs. a vertical bit.
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On Sat, 04 Feb 2006 14:55:32 GMT, "Leon"

Also, use a router that can run less than 22,000 rpm.
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The recomended speed for a 3" bit is 12,000 rpms which should be the lowest speed setting on most 21/4 hp routers.

good
bit.
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One big point in favor of doing them horizontally is that it's obviously easier to hold the panel down flat against a large table than to hold it perfectly vertical against a relatively tiny fence. I'd think that, at a minimum, you'd want to make an auxilliary fence a good six inches tall if you're going to do them vertically.
Sounds to me like a good excuse to buy a shaper...
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A less expensive alternative to a shaper might be to use a vertical router panel-raising bit horizontally; i.e., with a horizontally mounted router. Your Bosch would have more than enough power in that mode.
Chuck
Doug Miller wrote:

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Maybe make a jig thingy that slides on the table and has a high vertical to clamp to. Bract to the outside with a couple of 90s and it would be rigid. I'm sure it's in the books. No need to use the groove, just keep pressure against the fence. Love my shaper and 5 1/2" cutter, but I'd do this otherwise. Wilson
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wrote:

Either way works. I prefer moving the panels horizontally over the bit as I find it easier than the vertical method. Whatever way you choose, make at least two passes for a cleaner cut. A good DC will help move the chips for a better cut. For safety, think about guards, featherboards, push blocks, good lighting, clean floor, ear/eye protection and a clear-thinking brain.
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Perfect project for the radial arm saw!

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