Question about smoothness from thickness planers

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"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote in message

I really don't know. Never thought about it. I always buy 8 to 10 foot boards 6-8 inches wide. I don't have time or patients to flatten one side with a jointer. So a jointer is the only way to go for me.

Again, don't know, never tried it. My first step with rough lumber is to flatten one side on the jointer. I have worked with shorter pieces of rough stock. But I flatten first. I know I've seen jigs in magazines that allow you to shim and hold rough boards for flattening on a planer, with out a jointer. Never thought about using one, cause I have a jointer.
Darrell
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Even if you had the patients, how would you convince them to do the flattening for you? <g>
--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

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wrote:

I guess you cant trust spell checkers to do the thinking for you as well as check spelling!!!!!
Darrell
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I thing your write. Doughnut get you made?
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"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote in message

Okay, I kinda got that impression. If you buying rough stock lumber, you'll need to consider getting a jointer first. The jointer will flatten one side and square up one edge. You can then run the remaining rough side through the planer to get is parallel and final thickness. With out some jigs and finagling, it will be difficult to get parallel sides on rough stock.
Most of the lunchbox planers that have been suggested with give you good finish. But you will need to do some final sanding. I have an 8 year old Delta 22-560. I don't run a lot of lumber through mine and I have the original set of blades. If I take very light passes on the final passes, I can get a very smooth finish.
Darrell
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"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote in message

What jointer do you have?
Darrell
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"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote in message

I have the Delta. When the blades are new, you can go from planer to finish. As they age, the finish is less than perfect. You NEED a dust collector with it for best results.
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I missed the beginning of this thread... but have a different take on the role of the thickness planer than the theme I've seen in the replies thus far. I view the thickness planner as a dimensioning tool and not as a finishing tool. The resulting finish may be OK if you are painting or doing work that demands a less than fine finish but for furniture, cabinets, or architectural woodworking where a fine finish is desired the thickness planer is not a finishing tool.
No matter how good of a job the thickness planer does the surface still has small undulations from the rotating knives. Worst case the surface has compressed wood from dull knives that can later expand when the finish is applied... Hand planning or sanding (power or hand) is needed to remove those surface defects.
My new favorite tool is an L-N No 7... I take the wood out of the thickness planer and plane the thickness planer surface off with a few passes of the No 7. Sanding using a firm sanding block and progressively finer grades of paper will do the job too but the jointer hand plane does the job quickly and takes care of minor snipe quickly. I find that with soft woods (relative hardness rather than broad category of hard wood vs. softwood) that hand planning works better as sanding often hollows out the soft parts of the wood between growth rings while leaving the hard parts standing a bit proud. This might sound odd but I've found that my L-N No 4 with York pitch, a tight mouth and fine iron setting works wonderfully on new white pine... seems counter intuitive but a lot of the new white pine is so weak that it tears out with a more aggressive hand planning attack. Basically I'm treating it like a wild grain hard wood. ;~)
John
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My 607 Bedrock with a Hock iron does a fair job too. :-)
My current passion is for the 5 1/2 Bailey that I recently put into use, and it's a $40 plane with no special irons or breakers. It's a weird one though, the iron is 2 1/4" wide instead of 2 3/8". Hock has a 2 1/4" iron listed.
I think I'll make a shooting board for it. It is flat and square, with good mass.
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What is an L-N No. 7? I assume it's a planer of some sort, but I can't find it anywhere.
Jack
John Grossbohlin wrote:

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"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote in message

Plane, no planer. Lie-Neilson makes them.
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Tnx! Damn, it's like learning science. Half the time, I'm just trying to wade through the acronyms.
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

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It's a plane. Place it on the wood and push.
"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote in message

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"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote in message

As others have mentioned, it's a hand plane. Following is a link.
http://www.lie-nielsen.com/catalog.php?grp 64
I'd wanted one for at least three years. Tom L-N and his daughter manned the L-N booth at my club's woodworking show in March and I decided to go for it... With the "show special" discount and the "post card" discount it was slightly less painful than paying full pop. After using it, compared to my grandfather's abused and tired Millers Falls 22, I promptly forgot the price. This as it works so nicely! I find I use it for things where a smaller plane could work. ;~)
Saturday I prepped enough stock for the eight students signed up for my hand cut dovetail class. The students will make Shaker style pencil boxes--though some may opt for finer "Empire" style dovetails with contrasting wood. (More guys wanted to come but I am afraid to try to tackle more than eight students even with help!) To put the focus on the layout and cutting of the dovetails I figured I'd get all the stock ready ahead of time. Running the L-N No 7 over everything took care of the thickness planner snipe and undulations in short order and besides it was another excuse to use the plane!
John
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Thanks for the link!
John Grossbohlin wrote:

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Don't any more, but I used to prepare a couple pieces once a year for the kids as a demo. Scrub to smooth and beyond. Glad there was a shower near by, as it's sweaty work, especially to one who is used to letting the machine do it. My preference, as a matter of fact. Product over process there, anytime.
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I have the Delta 22-580. It does a great job, especially at the slower speed, but as other posters have stated you may need some final light sanding or scraping - unless the piece has some wild grain which can cause tearout. The blades will get some nicks and these will leave small lines. The Delta has rubber rollers so you will not see the "teeth" marks from models which have steel rollers which are machined for grip, but which leave little "teeth" marks.
I also have a drum sander which can sand without tearout, but also needs final light sanding or scraping to get a really smooth finish.
Bottom line is to expect some degree of final smoothing, but it should not take long.
Dave Paine.
"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote in message

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You need to study planer setup a bit more thoroughly. The serrated steel rollers are tension adjustable, which allows you to get the best compromise between no-slip feeding and the depth of cut which removes evidence of same. Important part of feed problems lies below, however, where the bed roller adjustment allows smooth feed with little pressure from above.
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The reason above folks suggested a Jointer is that a cupped or bowed board needs to be flattened on one side and then put that side down through the planner to get the other side parrallel which means that it also will get flat. The planner rollers will flatten a board going through but the board will want to go back to its cupped shape. If you get tear out feed the board in the other direction to get the grain in the correct direction. My delta has problems without dust collection as stated above. Also try a lighter pass at very end.
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A planer treats the wood fibers differently than a sander does. When the grain gets compressed by a planer it will stay compressed during sanding. The moisture from a stain or paint can cause the fibers to swell and thus re-expose the marks.
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