Question about gluing

I need to re-glue a dado joint on a bench made of rock maple. It looks like it was originally glued with yellow wood glue. Even after scraping, I would guess that yellow wood glue is not my best option. Any suggestions?
Thanks,
Mike
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On Sunday, March 4, 2012 10:37:58 PM UTC-5, Michael wrote:

If by dado joint you mean you have a cross-grain groove cut into a board into which another board sits with the same grain orientation (like a shelf into a groove in the side of a bookcase) then you have basically zero long grain to long grain gluing surface to begin with. I'd try to figure out why the joint failed in the first place, but my suggestion is that you try to reinforce the joint with biscuits or dowels or even screws and use epoxy. JP
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JayPique wrote:

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I second that approach. That is solid advice.
On 3/5/2012 5:56 AM, JayPique wrote:

it was originally glued with yellow wood glue. Even after scraping, I would guess that yellow wood glue is not my best option. Any suggestions?

which another board sits with the same grain orientation (like a shelf into a groove in the side of a bookcase) then you have basically zero long grain to long grain gluing surface to begin with. I'd try to figure out why the joint failed in the first place, but my suggestion is that you try to reinforce the joint with biscuits or dowels or even screws and use epoxy.

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On Monday, March 5, 2012 4:56:16 AM UTC-6, JayPique wrote:

It's end grain to long grain. Two four feet long (1 X 8s) are dadoed into a single vertical flat piece that serves as the sides of the box and the legs. I really can't tell why the joint failed. All the others seem tight and well done.
Mike
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On 3/5/2012 1:07 PM, Michael wrote:

it was originally glued with yellow wood glue. Even after scraping, I would guess that yellow wood glue is not my best option. Any suggestions?

which another board sits with the same grain orientation (like a shelf into a groove in the side of a bookcase) then you have basically zero long grain to long grain gluing surface to begin with. I'd try to figure out why the joint failed in the first place, but my suggestion is that you try to reinforce the joint with biscuits or dowels or even screws and use epoxy.

single vertical flat piece that serves as the sides of the box and the legs. I really can't tell why the joint failed. All the others seem tight and well done.

Expansion and contraction made the joint fail. Glue one end of the joint, not the whole length, to allow for expansion and contraction.
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On Monday, March 5, 2012 4:49:27 PM UTC-6, Leon wrote:

What kind of glue would you recommend?
Thanks for your help.
Mike
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On Mon, 5 Mar 2012 15:38:09 -0800 (PST), Michael

like it was originally glued with yellow wood glue. Even after scraping, I would guess that yellow wood glue is not my best option. Any suggestions?

into which another board sits with the same grain orientation (like a shelf into a groove in the side of a bookcase) then you have basically zero long grain to long grain gluing surface to begin with. I'd try to figure out why the joint failed in the first place, but my suggestion is that you try to reinforce the joint with biscuits or dowels or even screws and use epoxy.

single vertical flat piece that serves as the sides of the box and the legs. I really can't tell why the joint failed. All the others seem tight and well done.

1) Saw/plane/joint the two edges to remove -all- of the old glue. (It won't work otherwise, and you can ask anyone who has ever tried to reglue chair legs for that statistic) 2) Throw a bisquit or three in the edges for strength, then glue with Titebond I or II if inside, Titebond III if used outside. (Then pray. ;)
-- It is characteristic of all deep human problems that they are not to be approached without some humor and some bewilderment. -- Freeman Dyson
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On 3/5/2012 5:38 PM, Michael wrote:

like it was originally glued with yellow wood glue. Even after scraping, I would guess that yellow wood glue is not my best option. Any suggestions?

into which another board sits with the same grain orientation (like a shelf into a groove in the side of a bookcase) then you have basically zero long grain to long grain gluing surface to begin with. I'd try to figure out why the joint failed in the first place, but my suggestion is that you try to reinforce the joint with biscuits or dowels or even screws and use epoxy.

single vertical flat piece that serves as the sides of the box and the legs. I really can't tell why the joint failed. All the others seem tight and well done.

Epoxy if you want to just glue from where you are at now. Or more yellow glue if you take the wood back to bare surfaces again, void of glue residue.
And addendum to glueing one end, if wood movement is not critical and you can also simply glue the middle section of the joint and let the to outer edges move in and out. If you want a particular edge to remain in registration with another, glue that location and let the opposite edge/end do the moving.
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Racking stress. Reinforce with a cleat.
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On Tuesday, March 6, 2012 1:32:57 PM UTC-6, Father Haskell wrote:

I think that's probably the case. I'm going to use epoxy since I don't want to cut back on the tight-fitting dado. Thanks everyone for the good information.
Mike
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On 3/4/2012 9:37 PM, Michael wrote:

was originally glued with yellow wood glue. Even after scraping, I would guess that yellow wood glue is not my best option. Any suggestions?

The type of glue was probably not so much the problem as is the way it was applied.
If you are gluing lo9ng grain across the grain the natural expansion and contraction of the wood will cause a glue joint to fail if the wood does not expand at the same rate on both sides of the joint.
A common practice is to only glue one end of the joint and allow the wood to slip in the joint with climate changes and natural expansion and contraction.
Or use a mechanical fastener like a nut, bolt, and washer through over sized holes to allow for the expansion.
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