Power tools freezing in garage?

Page 1 of 2  
Hey gang, I am just wonderign if its OK to have power tools in the garage oevr winter? I live in Minnesota, so the garage gets well below freezing. I would like to store some of my lesser used tools out there, so I need to know if the bitter cold is bad for em. Any info would be greatly appreciated. Also, along those lines, are said conditions at all bad for storing hardwoods?
Thanks! Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My stuff is in an unheated garage with no problems. The only thing I do is bring the cordless tools, batteries and chargers in for the winter.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Caractacus Potts wrote:

No trouble if you let them warm up before using. Put them in a plastic bag before bringing into the house, this will keep it from frosting or condensation from forming. And you don't want to run a cold machine anyhow.
--
Mark

N.E. Ohio
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It's a shame you leave the batteryin your car when you take those lucky power tool batteries in the house. I'd think you should take it in too.

-- Woody
Check out my Web Page at:
http://community-1.webtv.net/WoodworkerJoe/WoodworkerJoesInfo
Where you will find:
******** How My Shop Works ******** 5-21-03
* * * Build a $20 DC Separator Can Lid. 1-14-03 * * * DC Relay Box Building Plans. 1-14-03 * * * The Bad Air Your Breath Everyday.1-14-03 * * * What is a Real Woodworker? 2-8-03 * * * Murphy's Woodworking Definitions. 2-8-03 * * * Murphy's Woodworking Laws. 4-6-03 * * * What is the true meaning of life? 1-14-03 * * * Woodworker Shop Signs. 2-8-03
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 17-Nov-2003, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Joe "Woody" Woodpecker) wrote:

You have lead-acid batteries in your tools?
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 17 Nov 2003 15:56:59 -0700 (MST), snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Joe "Woody" Woodpecker) wrote:

winters (routinely -20F), well, more than a few years ago, I *WAS* bringing the car battery in. It really made a difference in the morning starting up. The car started like a warm July day even though the outside temp was -20F.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I lived in SE Wisconsin too. Lake Geneva area. Well OK, it's more like NE Illinois, I guess.
On cold nights (0-20 below) I'd stick a 100W drop light on top of the battery and let the hood down gently. On bloody cold nights (20-40 below), I had a cheap heating pad sitting underneath the battery that I'd plug in.
Sure was a helluva lot easier than trying to pull a battery out in bitter cold. Block heaters and dip stick heaters never really did much for my car...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
[...]

Somehow your fake Lake Geneva has some problems. Here at the real one (Geneva, Switzerland, Old Europe) it hardly ever gets that cold.
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Don't they have battery heaters in the US? They're quite common here in the Great White North.
One friend of mine moved back to Maryland from Ottawa with a block and a battery heater in her car. Took it to a mechanic there who was afraid to touch it - he'd never seen a car with wires and plugs sticking through the front grill.
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Same thing happened to us when I was reassigned to class in Enid, OK after a stint in Minot, ND. Of course, it's colder there than Ottawa, and so I had two plugs, one for the trickle charger and one for the engine heater. We were allowed to plug trickle chargers at work, but not engine heaters, as it would have cost Uncle too much.
My cars stay outdoors here, and we rarely have any problems. Thinner oil and better battery plates seem to have overcome former problems.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The car in question was a '73 Ford Torino. Pretty easy in and out on that battery.

Block heaters do a lot for new/er cars. Too bad I don't have an outlet outside.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I had a '64 Karmann Ghia convertible and not much money. I used to bring the battery in the house every night so it would start in the morning. I eventually converted it to 12V with a Chevy alternator. It would not work on a VW as there was no room for it under the hood but the Gaia had plenty. Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, while rehabbing the house, I've yet to run into a need for a car battery. I have two sets of tools - one in the shop, one in the basement. I only have one set of cordless though so they live in the garage for 3 seasons while woodworking and inside the house for 1 season while rehabbing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wood doesn't care. I keep a couple hundred BF out there in stage toward use all the time.
I wouldn't leave any tool I loved out there. Just too much of a problem come spring and condensation time, much less problems with cold tools and wet, warm vehicles.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I guess you would be right about the moisture, however I have left my tools in the garage for the last 15 or so years and I have yet to find any rust or other problems with tem. I guess it depends on the climate that you live in. Here in Denver, I don't worry. Besides,I don't work well when it's cold and neither do the tools.

-- Woody
Check out my Web Page at:
http://community-1.webtv.net/WoodworkerJoe/WoodworkerJoesInfo
Where you will find:
******** How My Shop Works ******** 5-21-03
* * * Build a $20 DC Separator Can Lid. 1-14-03 * * * DC Relay Box Building Plans. 1-14-03 * * * The Bad Air Your Breath Everyday.1-14-03 * * * What is a Real Woodworker? 2-8-03 * * * Murphy's Woodworking Definitions. 2-8-03 * * * Murphy's Woodworking Laws. 4-6-03 * * * What is the true meaning of life? 1-14-03 * * * Woodworker Shop Signs. 2-8-03
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't know why, but Shop Vac says not to leave their products in a place they might freeze.
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Only reason I can think of is the Wet/Dry vac that could freeze up if not drained and dried. Mine stays out in the garage all winter for the past 10 years or so. . I only use it dry though. Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
have momma knit some sweaters for them.
dave
rob wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Good Question..... Condensation, moisture & possible rust would be your only real worry during drastic temperature changes, lightly spray some WD40 or other thin lubricant on some large newspapers or brown paper & when absorbed wrap the tools in the paper before storing them in the garage for the winter, that should prevent any problems if your garage is at all damp. Here in Canada that can be a serious consideration. The cold can make the rubber on the cords & boots crack but generally only if they are getting old & brittle anyway.
As for the wood.....not my scene man! Chop it up & burn it to keep warm <g>.
--
Jon Down
http://www.stores.ebay.com/jdpowertoolcanada
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"PWɮTLMAN 3" wrote

The colder the air, the less its ability to hold moisture. Besides, I don't know what part of Canada you're from but where I grew up (N. Alberta) the winter was dry as a popcorn fart. You couldn't buy humidity even if you won the 6-49.
That having been said, my tools have never had a problem, in either Northern Alberta or New Jersey, with cold or humidity in the winter.
--
Cheers,
Howard
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.