Possible gloat and a question

I just acquired a band saw, a table saw and a belt/disk sander. Details as follows:
Band saw: 14 inch 3/4 horse power Durex Industrial model 39 made in 1990.
Table saw: Rockwell Beaver made in Canada. Table is cast iron (weighs a ton) motor is outboard 14 amp Franklin Electric. I can't see any model numbers or dates.
Belt/disk sander: Sears Craftsman, model# 113.22590C driven by large motor under the stand.
I got all three for $300 Canadian! Is this a gloat??
Now my question. I already own a table saw, Sears Craftsman 3.0 max horse power, which I bought new for around $300 two years ago. The top is aluminum, 15 amp inboard motor, side extensions and dust bag. The Rockwell saw is certainly not fancy but it is extermely solid. Which one should I keep and which one should I dispose of?
Best Regards, Jack Fearnley
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jack wrote:

universal motor. The Rockwell should have an induction motor and sounds like a contractor saw. Assuming the Rockwell is in good condition, that is a step up in capability and a major step up in quality.
Please note that I have neither owned or used either saw.
Jess.S
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Jesse R Strawbridge wrote:

Thanks to all for the replies so far. Could you please explain what is a direct drive universal motor and why it isn't as good as an induction motor? I know very little about motors. How can I tell if the Rockwell has an induction motor?
Jack
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<<< Snip >>>

A direct drive has carbon "brushes" that contact the drive shaft of the motor. These can usually be removed for replacement when they go bad- so the easiest way (for me) to tell the difference is by looking for a pair of big screw heads on the outside of the motor where the brushes are inserted.
There's no particular reason why a universal motor is "better" than an induction one- they are two different things, and each have their uses.
A universal motor operates by passing current directly to the center spindle via carbon brushes. They have a tendancy to spark a little (how much depends on the motor) especially when you first hit the on button. They are louder and usually have a proprietary casing that makes them a little harder to replace, but they are also smaller and less expensive. They're good for power hand tools, where weight and size can be important factors.
An induction motor uses magnetic fields to turn the center spindle- there is no sparking, and they tend to be much quieter and deliver a little more power. They are also easier to replace, as they tend to come in a more standardized range of shapes and sized- and they sell them at most good hardware stores. But they are larger and heavier, and considerably more expensive. They're excellent for stationary tools, like the table saws that started this thread, where you don't have to carry them around.
There are plenty of folks here that have more knowledge on the subject than I do, and I'm sure I've got a thing or two wrong in the above explanation, but I think I hit the major points.
Hope this helps!
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Not necessarily. I have a direct drive saw. It has an induction motor.

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Prometheus wrote:

Yes, that helps a lot and it must be an inducton motor. I have been searching the web and I think my saw is a lot like a Rockwell International model 6002. It uses a 9" diameter blade whereas most saws today seem to use 10" blades. Might this become a problem or can I use 10" blades in the Rockwell?
I am curious about Rockwell, did they get absorbed by Delta or are they still around?
In my original posting I also mentioned the band saw which is a 14 inch 3/4 horse power Durex Industrial model 39 made in 1990. Does anyone know anything about this company and its products? I have looked on the web without much luck. Any attempts to Google "Durex" just buries one in condoms! :-)
Jack
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I'll take the old rockwell. I don't need a fancy new saw like your sears. When can I come get it?
Pete
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Unless there is something seriously wrong with it, the Rockwell is by far the better saw for woodworking IMHO.
--
No dumb questions, just dumb answers.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore, Maryland - snipped-for-privacy@charm.net
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Yep, it's a gloat, at least in my eyes.

Do you have to dispose of either?
If it were me, I'd keep the Rockwell. Not sure how Rockwell Beaver differs from Delta Rockwell, but if they're similar in any way (and I suspect they are) it's a superb saw. Don't know that I'd toss my new Delta away if I aquired one, but I'd definately keep the vintage tool, even if I had to build an addition to house it.
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