Planing a 2X4...

I need to cut some 2X4s down to about 3 inches wide for a skirt on a benchtop. I don't really want to run them through the tablesaw, as (right now) I don't have anything to support them on the outfeed side. I do have a planer, so I thought about standing them up on their ends (i.e., the 2" side down on the bottom, and the 4" side being vertical), and reducing their width that way. Anyone ever tried this, or am I just asking for trouble?
Jim
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Gameplayer) wrote:

cut shallow.
You might want to joint one edge first, before you plane the other edge.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

Also be aware of potential or probable snipe on each end of your 2by and allow for the two ends with the snipe to be cut off. There are ways to minimize or eliminate snipe.
Good luck! Hoyt Weathers
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Doug Miller responds:

Joint one edge, then gang them with clamps and joint the other edges at one time (unless there are too many--then gang them in smaller groups). Make small cuts, as you say.
No problems at all this way unless you leave the clamps up where the knives will hit. Then it gets noisy.
Charlie Self "The function of posterity is to look after itself." Dylan Thomas
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(PC Gameplayer) wrote:

A tablesaw is a very efficient tool for narrowing long stock. I now have a 55" long outfeed table derived from a damaged foldup conference table. Until then I used the pull technique you described but with the Grip-tite 2000 fence system. I lack the nerve to do it without the grip-tites.
Bob
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Go get a $19 roller stand from HD, Lowes, Woodcraft, etc. Use table saw. I used two of these until I built an outfeed table. I still use them cutting sheet goods, as an infeed extension.
dave

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Don't forget regular 2x4s in reality are 1 1/2 x 3 1/2. As others on the thread have already said, yes you can plane it down but first you need to be connected to a good DC or you'll get a face full of shavings; 2) keep a very careful watch so you don't taper the stock.
My own preference would be one roller on the outfeed side and a TS. There are people who are comfortable enough to walk around the saw and pull, but in that case I would have some form of feather board in front of the blade and another downwards from the fence; in general I don't consider it good practice if for no other reason you can't instantly get to the OFF switch.
Bernard R
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...

Seems to me that planing something that long will still require an outfeed table and it will take quite a few passes to take off 1/2".
Why not just recruit your wife, or mother, or son, or the paperboy to be your outfeed? All you have to do is support the piece with one hand for the last couple of feet as it leaves the blade. The whole job will be over in less than 10 minutes. Ed
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Not even a friend, spouse or kid?
--
It's probably time to change my sig line, eh?

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