Planer question

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Got a Ridgid 13" planer last year, haven't used it much but, dang, it sure is noisy. Today I was planing some 1x10x30 pine boards, trying to get them kinda flat so as to make some simple trivets for campouts. Planed the boards with the cup side facing down. Taking off a very little.
But, watching the dust going into the DC, I'm really not cutting much and by lowering the cutting head more it seems like all I'm doing is making more noise, hardly any more sawdust. So much noise I don't want to do this outdoors for the possiblility of annoying all my closest neighbors.
I've watched some utube videos, and it looks like I'm doing everything right, but I feel I'm doing something wrong. Surely my blades aren't this hopelessly dull by now?
I did clean my blades to remove some built-up residue from previous planing.
I'm contenplating taking my planer down to the Ridgid shop for a look-over, after all, it's free, but I don't want to look entirely stupid.
It seems to me that the blades might be bouncing the board because of the cupping. The worst board, cupping-wise, has about 1/8 inch in the middle of the 10" width.
Ralph
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Is there any possibility at all, that the blades are installed backwards?

Ahh. Yes, there is. Double-check to make sure you reinstalled them facing in the right direction.

Then check the orientation of the blades first. ALL of them.

Not likely on pine. I think you'll discover at least one blade installed backwards.
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On 3/10/2012 6:55 PM, Ralph Compton wrote: ...

The planer won't do any good on cupping anyway; the feed roller will simply press the board flat, run it under the cutterhead and out it will come recupped when the pressure is removed.
If you're trying to remove cupping, you need to surface a single face first before the planer. Jointer or handplane is the way to accomplish that.
As for the noise and apparent lack of sizable cuttings, make sure the knives are indeed installed correctly (both orientation and depth)
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On 3/10/12 7:34 PM, dpb wrote:

I remove cupping all the time with my planer. I don't think it's possible for mine to do what you describe. It would have to be set too low and I wouldn't be able to get the boards started.
--

-MIKE-

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"-MIKE-" wrote in message
On 3/10/12 7:34 PM, dpb wrote:

I remove cupping all the time with my planer. I don't think it's possible for mine to do what you describe. It would have to be set too low and I wouldn't be able to get the boards started. ==================================================================Yep.
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On 3/10/2012 8:22 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

That must be an interesting planer design that somehow manages to exert a forward thrust on the material sufficient to push it through the planer and take a cut while not bearing down on the material the same time.
Or, it's some other kind of wood than that which I can procure locally that has an infinite moment of stiffness so it isn't affected by that (nonexistant, of course) downward pressure.
How much, specifically depends on the thickness of the material and what it is; nominal 1" white pine just ain't that strong; you can flex it easily by hand. Run a piece of 3" roughsawn oak thru and yeah, the deflection will be minimal.
--
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On 3/11/12 1:24 PM, dpb wrote:

There's barely any downward pressure and I assume that's the case with most modern planers. I have a Delta 22-560 and the rollers are about 1/16" proud of the blades. It has a maximum cutting depth 3/32" The cast metal casing of the planer sits very close to the the level of the rollers. If I try to feed a board that is bowed enough that it would be pushed down by the rollers enough to "spring back," the casing would block the board from even entering the cutting area.
Here's another thing I've observed with most planers. There is very little room in the cutting depth adjustment between "the rollers grabbing and pulling the wood" and "the rollers slipping and not grabbing the wood at all." This tells me that the rubber on the rollers is doing the work of pulling, via simple friction, and not some extraordinary amount of downward pressure.
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"-MIKE-" wrote in message
On 3/11/12 1:24 PM, dpb wrote:

There's barely any downward pressure and I assume that's the case with most modern planers. I have a Delta 22-560 and the rollers are about 1/16" proud of the blades. It has a maximum cutting depth 3/32" The cast metal casing of the planer sits very close to the the level of the rollers. If I try to feed a board that is bowed enough that it would be pushed down by the rollers enough to "spring back," the casing would block the board from even entering the cutting area.
Here's another thing I've observed with most planers. There is very little room in the cutting depth adjustment between "the rollers grabbing and pulling the wood" and "the rollers slipping and not grabbing the wood at all." This tells me that the rubber on the rollers is doing the work of pulling, via simple friction, and not some extraordinary amount of downward pressure. ========================================================================================= Wait a while. There will be several people on here explaining to you that that is impossible. It's all in your mind. The boards that you have straitened over the years didn't really exist. It was all a dream. BTW, I have had the same dream, using the same planer, numerous times.
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On 3/12/12 4:34 AM, CW wrote:

==========================================================================================
That was so helpful.
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-MIKE-

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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.et says...

This is the world of illusion.
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On 3/11/2012 3:51 PM, -MIKE- wrote: ...

Interestingly, from the owners manual for the above machine I find...

...
The manufacturer recommends the same sequence of operations.
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On 3/12/12 9:52 AM, dpb wrote:

That is pretty much the SMO for flattening boards with a twist, crook, kink or bow. because in all these cases the planer will simply follow the warp of the board. However, cupping can be brought straight to the planer because, by definition, the board is straight on the other two axes.
Keep in mind as well that a board may warp as you remove thickness from it. Things like grain pattern and internal stresses can cause this.
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[...]

If cupping is the only flaw, and the board is otherwise straight with no twist or bow, then I'd agree with you -- but IME cupping is usually accompanied by some degree of twist or bow as well.
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On 3/12/12 10:37 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

I don't want to get off on a tangent. I was dealing with the specific facts presented. It was purported that the planer "won't do any good on cupping" which isn't true.
I was providing information to contradict the specific claim, "the feed roller will simply press the [cupped] board flat, run it under the cutterhead and out it will come recupped when the pressure is removed."
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My planer manual suggested the use of a shim (and maybe a sled... it's been a few seasons) to keep the board from deforming too badly under the wheels.
It depends on the board, I had one a couple months ago that would flatten out quite easily, so it would plane smooth but not flat. Most of the others, however, will retain their shape provided I take extremely light passes.
Puckdropper
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Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 3/12/2012 11:13 AM, Puckdropper wrote: ...

+1
The principle is, in general, true (as I noted).
Regardless of what mikey says, there _IS_ downward force on the feed roller (and to a lesser extent both the cutterhead and the outfeed roller as well).
There will be _zero_ frictional feed force w/o it, regardless of how sticky the feed roller cover is.
F_friction = F_normal * Coeff_Friction
is a physical principle.
<http://library.thinkquest.org/10796/ch4/ch4.htm (Chap 6)
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On 3/12/12 11:49 AM, dpb wrote:

Oh, we're being condescending now. Ok, jerkwad.

Do the math for me, then, genius. How much downward force is there when there is barely 1/16" clearance between the metal case of the planer and the bottom of the rollers.
Also, why is is that I push a board through the planer with very little effort with my fingertips on a planer with worn rollers and still get a full removal of material. And explain how I can do this on a cupped board. Do the math for me, Mr. Hawking.
I'm guessing you have experience with a planer that exerts a bunch of unnecessary downward force. Fine, I don't argue that your does that. But don't sit there and belittle my experience on my planer with your pissy little condescending attitude, Missy.
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-MIKE-

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On 3/12/2012 6:05 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

I'm no more condescending than you in "correcting" something that didn't need correction.
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On 3/12/12 9:31 PM, dpb wrote:

Get over it and lighten up. You're the one who made an absolute statement that a planer won't do anything to correct cupping, which is completely false.
Sorry if you got offended at me "correcting" your false statement.
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On 3/12/2012 9:43 PM, -MIKE- wrote: ...

You can ask and post whatever you want as long as you don't spout nonsense on top of me. You want to claim the planer is the tool of choice for flattening, go ahead, but do it on your own and I'll let it ride.
Stomp on my info to the OP and _THAT_ is interference up with which I will not put... :)
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