old craftsman RAS

As long as we're on the RAS subject, I've recently acquired an old Craftsman just like this one http://www.newwoodworker.com/reviews/ras.html# that needs some work. The biggest problem I'm having is that the carriage rocks laterally quite a bit. After taking it apart, I noticed that there is quite a bit of play between the carriage bearings and the arm rails. I can't imagine how this could have happened, though. The bearings are not adjustable and are mounted directly into a cast housing for the carriage, so they really couldn't have moved out over time. The rails don't present any significant wear.... definalty not enough to produce the amount of play there is. The only thing I can think to do is to take the rails off and make some kind of curved washers to put behind them to bring them out.
Has anyone addressed a similar problem with this saw?
Thanks,
Moore
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Looks similar to my RAS. If it is, the adjustable rollers are on the left side of the carriage. The two bolts on that side are eccentric.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'll take another look again tonight. It looked like all 4 of the bearings were non-eccentric, but it sure makes sense that there should be eccentric bearings on at least one side.
Thanks for the info
Moore

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 24 Nov 2004 08:46:26 -0800, moore wrote:

On a Searz RAS, the roller bearings are adjustable on the left hand side. With the left hand cover removed, the bearings have a locking nut under them and a cam type bolt through them that allows them to be adjusted.
You need to get the amnual for this or similar or preeferrably Jon Eakes book on setting up and tuning the RAS:
<http://www.wired-2-shop.com/joneakes/ProductDetail.asp?ProdID=3&nPrdImageID=&CatID=3
When adjusted properly, there should be no movement vertically or side to side and the motor should move smothly but with some even resistance along the entire length of the track.
-Doug
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
And are not the rods down the inside of the arm also movable/loosen and turn a couple few degree to make a new bearing surface or am I mixed up with the Delta?
UA100
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 24 Nov 2004 23:27:03 +0000, Unisaw A100 wrote:

If they're moveable on the Searz, it'd hafta be by 180 degrees as they're attached with a screw on each end into the arm casting.
-Doug
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Another possibility is there is an adjustment for the "riding bearing" on a center track. Look just above the handle to see if there is an adjusting screw at that point.
If the saw was made by Emerson Electric, you may be eligible for a safety upgrade. They will supply you with parts and instructions for rebuilding the head assembly at no charge. I don't know the website for the instructions, but you should be able to Google for it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dustmaker wrote:

Huh? What do you mean "rebuilding the head assembly"? The safety upgrade consists of a new guard, a new handle, and a new table. Nothing has to be "rebuilt" unless you count removing and replacing two Allen screws to change out the handle "rebuilding".
And there is nothing in the recall kit that would have any effect on the adustment which is giving him difficulty.
--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You guys were right on! Turning the top bolt on the left bearings brought it right in. Snug as a bug in a rug!
Thanks a million.
Moore
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 27 Nov 2004 20:14:47 -0800, moore wrote:

But, you gotta know *how* snug. If you can put your finger (covered by a rag) on the bearing and move the carriage without being able to stop the bearing rotation, you have it right. And you need to set both bearings with this same resistance. And, you should be able to move the motor the full length of the arm with a smooth and consistant resistance.
And, you gotta find the lock nut under the bearing (usually) and lock things down so they don't squirm loose.
-Doug
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.