newbie question: metal lathe - any use for woodworking

Good day to you all,
I have an opportunity to buy an old 1960 metal lathe (boxford - The "9" swing screwcutting lathe)20A 500V
My question is:
Can metal lathes be used for woodworking?
If yes what should I look out for?
Thanks
In hope
Paul Jones
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Paul Jones wrote:

because I use mine for metal, I'm not sure the two different uses will coexist peacefully.
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Works great. You can use the toolpost and be as precise as you know how. Wilson

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Paul Jones) wrote in message

Paul, Have made 50 pens on my ENCO metal lathe as well as other things. The only problem is no standard tool rest. I can crudely shape the wood by moving in x and y and then use sandpaper to smooth the curve. It is really useful when you want a diameter to be constant over a large distance (like a straight rolling pin) or want to precisely hit a diameter or lateral distance. The slower speed is also not ideal, but I smooth with sandpaper anyway. jaime
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Where you going to find 500 Volt power supply???
Bottom line, is that to a degree, YES you can use a metal lathe for some wood turning, but considering that you can buy a woodlath for from under $500 to well over $2000, you would probably be better off with a dedicated woodlath
John
On 12 Feb 2004 02:41:21 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Paul Jones) wrote:

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I know that Beall of The Beall Tool Company used big industrial metal lathes in his woodworking business.
Ted
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Paul Jones) wrote in message

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On 12 Feb 2004 09:25:13 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@iron.net (Bigpole) wrote:

Boxfords are pretty well known (UK anyway) as they were typical equipment in schools. As a result, almost every S/H Boxford I've ever seen has been in dire condition. They're a useful size of lathe and I'd prefer one to a Myford 7 (much cheaper too !), but be careful with what you're buying. Check bed wear especially. That said though, they are well made and survived school abuse pretty well.

You can turn metal on them, and the ability to turn metal is often a very useful part of woodworking.
You can also turn small wooden pieces on them. You'll need to produce some sort of toolrest, which is pretty easy. They'll never make a _good_ woodturning lathe, as they're too small and inconvenient to use (slow to change speed, access and centre height are somewhat less than ideal for hand turning).
If you want a lathe and it's a good deal, then I'd recommend it. You'll never regret having a lathe to hand.
If you want a woodturning lathe though, look at what's available as entry-level lathes. There are some good deals around.
--
Smert' spamionam

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