Need Picture of Bow ties in a table top


After about 30 minutes of looking I still cannot find a picture of bow ties used to join pieces of a table top. Can someone give me a url with a picture. Many Thanks, JG
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JGS wrote:

No but they look just like they sound...like two joined dovetail pins, half in one piece, other half in the other.
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JGS (in snipped-for-privacy@sympatico.ca) said:
| After about 30 minutes of looking I still cannot find a picture of | bow ties used to join pieces of a table top. Can someone give me a | url with a picture. Many Thanks, JG
They're also called "dutchmen". I found a photo at
http://www.artbabyart.com/desktopimages/dutchman.JPG
HTH -- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
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JGS wrote:

No, but it is a standard inlay known as a Dutchman.
Start looking at inlay kits for routers in the catalogs.
Lew
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Please don't shoot me. I know your interest is in a picture of a table top, but I wanted to share with you one of my favourite designs of all time. It uses the bow ties (butterflies) as a method to join large panels in doors. I swear... one day I will build one of these. I have NO idea why I like it as much as I do but that page of a 1984 Stickley catalogue is well worn.
http://tinyurl.com/c3egy
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Thanks guys. I can use those pictures to show a client what they would look like. Cheers, JG
JGS wrote:

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Rememberthat the lengthwise butterflies go _across_ the grain of the top. There's a high-ish end furniture shop in Bath with a table in the window where they go lengthwise. If you know anything about what you're looking at, this sticks out a mile.
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wrote:

And in theory at least, will oppose long-term shrinkage in the panels, possibly encouraging some growth in the thickness of the glue line.
As I say, in theory! I closely inspected some in an Ernest Gimson table in the Cheltenham museum and saw minute signs of this.
Jeff G
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Jeff Gorman wrote:

Depends how firmaly they're glued. I've seen some really old butterflies (18th century) where there was a clear gap opening up, but it was at the ends of the butterfly. Rather than the glue joint opening up, the butterfly was working loose instead. Presumably the butterfly was losing width.
I've not seen a Gimson piece showing any real signs of movement yet. Was this the hayrake table? I ought to go back and take a look again, it's a while since I've been to the Cheltenham gallery and it's a good collection.
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