Need advice on polyurethane on red oak baseboard

I have some red oak baseboard that I need to finish and want to apply a polyurethane that will prevent yellowing. Are all brands of polyurethane the same or are there any brands that I should avoid? Thanks. Best Regards, Sandy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you want to avoid yellowing, use a water based. The oil will yellow. The oak will darken over time anyway.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yep, and our eyes still see amber colors as warm and friendly. Makes absolutely clear, or with some water-borne types, cold bluish stuff look weird.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This type of cut is quite common in industry. they sell special machines to do it. I would look into buyig on of the machines made for this before I tried any jury rigged operation. Woodsmith has a planner set up to do this type of cut and I believe Grizzly also has a set up for this. The cost of either machine is much lower then then the cost of a hospital visit to the emergency room, even if you have good insurance.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 12 Jan 2007 07:43:19 -0600, sweet sawdust wrote:

Uh, how does a woodsmith "planner" prevent polyurethane from yellowing? And how does it prevent a hospital visit as a result of applying polyurethane?

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I bet his response was meant for the thread about the 2 10" blades cutting multiple pieces.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"J. Clarke" wrote in message

What! ... you haven't heard about the new, 2007, laser guided, anti-yellowing, "planner"!!?? ;)
... wanna bet he was replying to the thread about gang ripping with two blades on a table saw and got the wrong thread?
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 1/06/07
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Whoops!!! wrong message sorry

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
For a reason now forgotten, I was showing a neighbor a couple pieces I had made a while back. Both oak, one finshed w/water base, one w/oil. The oil actually looked better as oak has that natural amber hue and the oil poly warmed it. And, as stated, oak will darken a bit as it ages.
Renata

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@hp.com wrote:

I would also use oil based. When I first started in this hobby, I always used water based Poly. The projects I made don't look near as nice as the ones finished in oil.
Also, oil poly is more durable/tough, which is nice to have on a baseboard which might get banged from time to time.
I don't know if there's any specific brands to avoid. Just get one of the major brands and you should be fine. If this is the first time you've ever applied poly, I recommend getting "polyuerethane for floors". It is thinned a little bit, which makes it much easier to avoid getting brush marks/bubbles. That's what I use.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.