Need advice on making a chair part

I have to make the top back part of a chair. The curved part where the spindles connect to on the back. What is the best way to make the curved back part so that I can put the spindles into it? I have a radial arm saw, table saw, jig saw, planners. But I do not have a band saw or drill press, soon I hope to have it.Thanks for any advice
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Well. if I am envisioning your part correctly, you might need to borrow bandsaw and drill press time from a friend. The curved top can be cut from a piece of heavy stock, with thickness of the curved dimension, on a bandsaw - not terribly difficult. Depending on the type of back spindles (or whatever) you might get by with a hand drill motor but drill press would be easier.
Kinda hard to say without actually knowing what it looks like.
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On Fri, 10 Sep 2004 09:54:08 -0400, "Major Canuk"

Best way is with a bandsaw. I wouldn't fancy chairmaking without one.
If you don't have one, a traditional bowsaw will do it, but more slowly. These are quite cheap, or you can make your own. I have several, because it's easier to make extra frames than to change blades in them.
--
Smert' spamionam

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Another way to make the curved crest rail of a chair is to edge glue multiple blocks of 8/4 stock using a coopering technique. Go for a total curve of about 30 to 35 degrees for a comfortable chair. To know the angle you need to cut on the side of each block the formula is 35 degrees divided by 2 times the number of joints. Then use a bandsaw to cut the curved profile you want (or you can sand/scrape/plane if you like the manual labor way!). Doing edge glue ups of these types of blocks gives you an interesting vertical grain pattern on the back versus the traditional horizontal grain. This is especially nice if your chair has a solid wood seat. I've done 2 rockers like this recently and I love the balance the vertical grain gives to the rocker. Just my 2 cents . . .
Gary A

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Caveats: Using only the tools you have.
Depending on the size of the back, you can build a cheap steam chamber, bend and clamp over a form. Or cut thin strips and glue, clamp over a form.
Alternate Method: Use this as an excuse to buy a bandsaw.
Dave

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One? Or maybe six? And does it have to match anything currently in use? Who else needs to be pleased with the outcome?
Enquiring minds want to know. So do I.
Patriarch
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I just finished two chairs that sound like your project. I cut the curve of the crest rail from three inch thick stock and drilled out the holes with a hand drill. But...I used a piece of plywood with holes drilled first to set up the right spacing of the spindles for the final "look" that I wanted. Actually I made several trial runs before I found the right spacing. Once the right spacing is determined, it is easy to transfer the hole location to the actual crest rail. One chair I made the holes were too close together so the final "look" was like a barrel back chair. It the holes are farther apart, the affect is that of a "fan back" chair. In my case the spindles start at the seat back and run through the arm piece and end at the crest rail. I tried to take my crest rail hole spacing from the spacing of the holes in the chair seat, but that did not work well due to the curve of the overall chair back. Confused yet? If this is not clear, let me know and I will try to give more detail. If this does not work for you, you can always laminate a curved crest rail using 1/8inch thick stock glued up on a curved form. I did this with my arm piece and it worked fine. Most who look at it can not tell it is laminated. GCS
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