My 1st go at Neander face jointing


Hey all,
Well, dang, it wasn't that difficult, really. But then, it was just a piece of scrap I thought I'd try it out on - no "pressure."
A little background. Over the past several months I went through the internal debate of which to save for and acquire 1st : "power jointer v. power planer/thicknesser." Got feedback here, with opinions/reasonings on both sides of course, but I ended up purchasing a power planer/thicknesser (15" General Int'l).
My thinking was, edge jointing can be done various ways - router, TS, jointer plane; the 1st two I already owned, the 3rd I acquired when Steve Knight had his 50%-off sale recently (ash w/ walnut D handle). So, edge jointing I had "covered."
As far as face jointing prior to sticking the wood in the planer, well, I came back here for more discussion. Some people sweat the flatness of the reference face more than others, when it comes to deciding whether a board is "ready" to be fed into the planer/thicknesser. Some would only wager a board that is purely cupped can be successfully (or safely) thicknessed as-is - success including ending up w/ the two faces co-planar. Others point to various sled/shim arrangements that will hold nearly any twisted/bowed board steady and allow one to essentially turn your thicknesser into a jointer.
Still another approach for the evil twisted board (besides kindling), is to use a handplane to knock down the high spots on one side and get it "good enough" to use as the reference face for the thicknesser.
And so, I decided to have a go at it this way. It wasn't much - a 3/4" poplar board (originally an S3 from the BORG) 20" by 4", but when you pressed down on one corner, the opposite shot up 3/16" - a quite noticeable teeter-totter.
With a bench hook on my TS top, a shim for the poplar, and the Knight jointer plane, I had at it. Focussed my energies at the two "quadrants" of one of the faces; no marking guage, just several swipes and then I'd flip it over to test it on the TS top. A few rounds of that got me pretty darn close; had a bit of convexity to this face, so swiped the middle section a few times, and then one more set of full length passes, and it was "rock free!" Definitely a face suitable to lay on the bed of the thicknesser.
Now, after face jointing, but before thicknessing, the minimal thickness of the board is sitting at 5/8". ... if you think about the 3/16" of original rocking, half that is 3/32" (the teeter-totter is balanced) - I took off just a 32nd more than needed on my 1st try (given the twist was symmetrical, blah, blah, blah). Hmph. Not bad. I should be able to end up w/ a 9/16" board after thicknessing.
So, if you're still wrestling w/ the "jointer v. planer" debate yourself, here's some feedback on one way it can be done. Even by The New Guy :)
-Chris
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Chris wrote: snip>So, if you're still wrestling w/ the "jointer v. planer" debate yourself, here's some feedback on one way it can be done.<snip Nice goin'! There's more than one way to skin a cat. I've got 3 cats. Tom
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tom wrote:

Do they get cold in the winter?
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You know, I hadn't thought of that. I know I can't plane a board properly with a handplane, but I could use it simply to knock down some high spots and then run it through the planer.
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toller wrote:

Yeah, I'm with you on that. I'm amazed by the folks who can go through the whole progression of planes on a roughsawn board and end up with it flat, smooth, and true! I'm just glad to find a method that works for me w/o having to buy a powered jointer.
-Chris
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