Mitering Two Different Board Widths - Chinese Solution #1


Noticed that in the Chinese rosewood furniture I inherited - and there's literally almost a ton of it, that they'd come up with a more elegant solution to the "challenge" of joining two different width boards at 90 degrees to each other. Have posted two pics in a.b.p.w. of an example of one of their solutions.
charlie b
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charlie b wrote:

Not to ruffle your feathers, CB, but the Chinese solution is a hell of a lot simpler than yours. ;)
R
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RicodJour wrote:

Feathers hell! I want hair! Though driving The Little White Car (Miata convertible) is always fun - I'd sure like to add the feeling of the wind in my hair. On the other hand, I'm more aero dynamic - which, with current gas prices - $3.399 for regular unlead out here in the SF Bay Area - has its advantages.
The Chinese Solution #1 is definitely not simpler - since it involves rounding over the corner AND the top edges of the horizontal parts. And if you round over the top edges of the horizontal parts you should round over the bottom edges as well. That would require rounding over the inside edges of the "leg" as well.
Them Chinese furniture makers are a crafty (pun intended) clever lot. (see my subsequent posting D'ja ever REALLY study a nice piece of furniture?
Fun stuff this woodworking thing.
charlie b
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wrote:

Board widths are small [s] and large [L]...
s/L is the tangent of one angle; the small board if using them as indicated here. The other [large board angle cut] is 90 minus that ...or whatever else you want as a total angle, minus that.
It gets trickier when ...the boards need compound angles.
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I am not great at trig, but this just does not seem right.
Guess who wrote:

suppose they are both 4". [s] = 4 and [L] = 4

4/4=1
The other [large board angle cut] is 90 minus that

90 - 1 = 89
So, cut 1 at 1 degree, and 1 at 89 degrees? Right.

Tricky enough as is.
Harvey
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No
tan A = 4/4
A = arctan 1
A = 45 degrees
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Leuf wrote:

Ok, ok. I *said* I was no good at trig! *grin*
Harvey
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I agree with that "one thousand percent"! *GRIN*

Wrong. Repeating, "S/l is the _tangent_ of the angle..."
so tan(angle) = 4/4 == 1 thus angle = arctan(1) == 45 degrees
and 90-45 = 45
So, cut 1 at 45 degrees, and the other at 45 degrees (too).

Jimmy Stewart insists that it is not beyond the capabilities of the average Pookah. :)
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