Long Miters

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wrote:

I'm not too surprised- I've used my disc sander for this as well. It's just more work than cutting it dead on the first time. But when I just had a little table saw that was hard to adjust properly, the disc sander was invaluable.
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on it, but how is the small piece of angled walnut? playing a role? Is it attached to the miter gauge?
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miter gauge. The block and gauge has been very accurately setup and clamped into position.
Dave
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OH!!! Thanks Dave, I see it now. Sorry about that, I thought... Well you know, I shouldn't think!

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Hi,
    One additional thing to be careful about is the the front and back pieces (and similarly the two side pieces) pieces must be the the same width from 45 degree cut to 45 degree cut. For example when making picture frames, all of the corner cuts can be perfect 45's, but if the top piece is 1/16" longer than the bottom, things will not fit.     Until I understood and took care about this I had an awful time. I would check and recheck my angles, and every one looked good, but a dry fit showed they did not fit together. I would carefull sand the angles eliminate any gap in the joiint, but the if the pieces matched up on the inside of the corner, one would be a tad long on the outside.
    My suggestion is you get a 45-45-90 draftsman triangle, and this should let you set you blade to a 45. Be carful to not get avoid the teeth that stick out beyond the plae of the blade. Then be very careful about widths. A sled with a stop can help.
Thanks Roger Haar Tucson
****************************************************** Prometheus wrote:

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"Tex"

Miters require time and exactness. I have found that to make exact, very precise miters, several thing need to be considered. Board width and thickness, precise lengths and accurate cutting. For me, it just too many variables. When I need an exact miter, I cut the piece long and then using my 12" disk grinder, I adjust, sand, fit and adjust again until the fit is perfect. This works well up to 5" or less. For longer miters, I take the time to set up the tablesaw for precise 45's. I always setup using a miter sled and set the angle by measuring the sled to blade angle - not tablesaw to blade.
See picture below
http://www.teamcasa.org/workshop/images/diskmiter.jpg
Dave
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Tex wrote:

Hey, Tex
I do a lot of the same type of work you do. I never could make a decent dovetail so I used box joints to begin with and made a jig to go on my router table. These worked fine but I wanted an alternative so I got a cheap one of these:
http://www.axminster.co.uk/name/disc+sander/sfile/1/jump/4/product-Perform-CCBDS46-Belt-and-Disc-Sander-21703.htm
With a belt&disc sander you can make very accurate 45 (or any) degree miters by sanding them. What I do for flat sides, tops, etc is first make certain that all the corners are 90 degrees. Then I set the top resting table to 45 a degree tilt using a square, draw a line about 1/4" above the bottom of the side I want ti miter and sand down to that line using the belt. For trim and any long pieces I want to miter the ends of I use the miter fence on the lower table and push the end of the piece into the disc. It all takes a little practice and a steady hand but the miters are clean, smooth and above all accurate. This machine also makes removing very small amounts (like 1/16") very easy. I couldn't do without it now.
FoggyTown
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"Tex" wrote in message

Got at router table?
A "45 degree locking miter" bit on a router table is a viable option for accurate "long miters" for box corners ... and you don't have to cut/deal with splines.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 5/6/06
  Click to see the full signature.
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com says...

simple, easy, and the spline and spline cut are included at no extra charge -- what a deal!! Provided, ... ????
Do you cut them this way? How do the joints come out? Absolutely precise, as in DEAD NUTS on or leaving a bit to be desired?
For those interested, take a look at: http://mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/smarthtml/pages/bt_loc km.html
There are probably other sites/vendors but I generally use MLCS for router bits. I've had good results (ordering and using) their products.
Thanks Kac, Tex
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Yes, it is difficult to precisely get 45 degrees. When you put all the pieces together, any errors add up and are more noticeable.
A different approach is to set up for 45 degrees as accurately as possible but cut the two bevels that join up as complimentary angles.
If you are tilting the table saw blade to get a bevel at 45, run the second piece through vertically using a tenoning jig such as http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page 185 .
For miters, I use a specialized sliding table that has two guides at 45 to the blade but very accurately set to 90 degrees between them.
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