Loft bed

Getting ready to start designing a loft bed for my daughter, and one design consideration is the likelihood of her taking it off to college. Given the size of a typical college dorm room, would we run into trouble here if the bed size was a double, or should I stick with a twin?
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College Dorm = Twin or Twin Long
I've never seen a twin long in a retail store, but many colleges use them.
When my daughter has gone to weekend events at a college, we've had to hunt for the twin long sheets.
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wrote:

You're absolutely right about that. I have a twin long bed and it's a real bear to find fitted sheets for it, at least up here in Canada. I did finally find some available at Gobelin's Linen. Don't know if they have any outlets in your area.
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Brad Bruce wrote:

FWIW, I just went out and measured the one that my the GF many moons ago had in her dorm room and it turned out to be 40x74. That one was thrown together by a student and fit the room nicely.
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Some colleges don't allow loft beds at all. Something about personal injury and lawsuits.
A double bed might not fit well into the room, which could present problems with her roommate and start a turf war.
If you're going to make a double, and a twin mattress is used on it, the extra space won't go to waste.
R
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Steve Turner wrote:

Check with the school to see if they allow it. Many school have beds in the rooms and don't allow them to be brought in for many, various reasons, one of which is liability.
Yours, no doubt would built like a tank, but their lawyer bean counters don't care.
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Steve Turner wrote:

Just came up here to AR last week, primarily to haul back youngest daughters "stuff", in storage from the last 4 1/2 years of college.
Three different dorm rooms from the get go and I'd have to say stick with a single bed. Even in the newest, multi-multi million dollar dorm "suites", space is at a minnimum, and the older, more venerable the college is, the less space.
I would build if for now, not for possible use in a future college dorm room. Entirely too many unknowns.
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Don't dorms already have a bed?
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Leon wrote:

It's been 25 years since I've been in a college dorm, so I have no idea. One our friends' daughters recently shipped off to college and she was able to take her loft bed with her. My understanding is that loft beds are very popular in college dorms because of the possibilities for a personal workspace beneath the bed, but if I'll be restricted to a twin sized mattress that's not much room to work with. There is 15 inches of width difference between a twin (39") and a double/full (54").
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Steve Turner wrote:

The one's at my youngest daughter's were multi-function: single, bunk, or loft. And that is exactly how the majority of the girls used them, as a loft, with a desk beneath.
Nice thing is they were hell for stout and well made, and to move/transport something similar would be a PITA. DAMHIKT. :)
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Ok, the solution would appear to be an extensible, elevate-able, twin bed that - with the extension, can hold a "full/double" mattress and with the foundation parts added, can be lofted to the required height.
Since the idea of transporting the completed work is a design consideration, the idea of a bed constructed of suitable sub- assemblies would seem to work out nicely.
If the Long Twin Mattress is the same length as the "Full/Double" that would be the way to go. Ooops, should have said "design for the length of the two mattresses to be employed." Or should that be "deployed?"
Now, that would be a creation worth a patent or two, no?
If you go that far, call it the "Tarballs College Bedding Solution" and send me a picture!
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Leon wrote:

They have a bed but it takes up some of the very limited floor space in a dorm room. A loft bed is raised so that the floor space under it becomes somewhat available--there's not standing room but there is sitting room.
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That's been my experience with 3 different dorm housings. They've been all furnished with standardized furniture, and even if you wanted to bring something else in the school wouldn't allow you to remove the existing furniture.
Naturally, check with the future school if you're considering it. They all have their own rules on this. Think about this too: A good bed frame can easily last 20-25 years. University rarely lasts longer than 5, usually it's 4.
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For college dorm use, use a twin.
As has been mentioned by others, though, it's not at all certain that the college will allow you to bring an outside loft in (or, for that matter, that they will not already provide a loft bed--I know the institutional furniture in my dorm was modular loft bed units). If she or you would otherwise prefer a double bed, build that and accept that it probably won't work for a dorm. If she gets or shares an apartment at some point in or after college, the loft bed would again be very useful, and the regulations much more relaxed.
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Steve Turner wrote:

Depends. Who's she going to share the bed with?
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HeyBub wrote:

I knew that was going to come up. :-)
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On Sun, 11 Oct 2009 09:36:51 -0500, In newsgroup "rec.woodworking",

I'd definitely recommend twin for a dorm environment. If you're still looking for designs, I found a very good set of bunk-bed plans that can easily be adapted to a loft bed, simply by omitting one of the frame boards on the lower bunk: http://bit.ly/8s3xt5
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On Sun, 11 Oct 2009 09:36:51 -0500, In newsgroup "rec.woodworking",

I'd definitely recommend twin for a dorm environment. If you're still looking for designs, I found a very good set of bunk-bed plans that can easily be adapted to a loft bed, simply by omitting one of the frame boards on the lower bunk: http://bit.ly/8s3xt5
(Sorry if this is double posted, but had trouble sending last time.)
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