Leigh D1600


Has anyone tried the Leigh D1600 yet. From reading the specs it does exactly what the D4 does but just a little shorter. For the $100. or so difference I can't really see where I'd need the 24" over the 16" jig. Hmmm thinking.
--

Mike S.
snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The extra length is handy so that you can set up both ends of the jig to mirror each other. This helps make opposite ends of joints appear symmetrical. For example if you only set the guide fingers on the left side of the jig the opposite ends of the joint would look backwards if you used uneven spacing. Say you make the spacing tight on the left side of the jig and adjusted the fingers to be wider apart as they neared the center of the jig. You cut one end of a piece, take the board out and flip it end for end and make the cuts in the other end of the piece. The result would be thin tails and pins at the top at on end of the piece and the opposite end would have wider pins and tails near the top of the joint.
If you use both left and right sides of the jig and lay out one end of the jig fingers to mirror the other end of the jig and then cut one end of the piece on the left side, flip the piece end for end and cut on the opposite end of the jig the result on the piece will be joints that mirror each other.
With the 16" jig, you limit your self to about 8" vs. 12" if you use the symmetrical set up described above. If that would never be a problem go for the cheaper 16" model.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It definitely depends on what you plan to build, but I've used nearly the full 24" capacity on my D4 many times. Most notably on blanket chests and some chest carcases. I have also done what another responder suggested - and set up for 2 parts to be cut in one set-up on either end of the jig.
I'm sure you'll love the jig - it is great and is really easy to learn (no matter what some people would like you to believe).
Mike

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I bought the D4 with the intentions of "moving up" in the future, maybe purchasing their other templates ...
JJS
Mike S. wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Notice the D4 also handles somewhat thicker as well as wider stock. From their web site http://www.leighjigs.com :
D1600 Features: Maximum board width 16" Through dovetails up to 13/16" thick Half-blind dovetails up to 1" thick Sliding dovetails up to 1" thick
D4 Features: Stock width from 1" to 24" Through dovetails 1/8" to 1-1/4" thick Half-blind dovetails up to 1-1/2" thick Sliding dovetails up to 1-1/2" thick
Otherwise I'd expect the D1600 quality to be equal to the D4, and also expect to see more templates and accessories in the future if the D1600 proves to be popular.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The d4 can handle thicker stock. If you want to do casework, get the d4. if all you'll ever do is drawers or smaller boxes, the d1600 is probably enough.
brian
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.