Large spade bits

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I need 2", but can't find anything larger than 1-1/2. Anyone know of a source?
Thx, B.
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Nope.
Can you make a 1-1/2" hole than make a 1/2" rabbet with a router. Followed up by a flush trim bit referenced off of the rabbet?
Stoutman www.garagewoodworks.com
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Buddy Matlosz wrote: > I need 2", but can't find anything larger than 1-1/2. Anyone know of a > source?
If nothing else but from a point of safety, I'd use a hole saw.
Lew
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Buddy Matlosz wrote:

how about a forstner bit?
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wrote:

No, and I'd be sort of scared to use one...
Won't a forstner bit work? Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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I need to drill a series of vent holes in the plywood soffit that was recently replaced under my garage roof. I drilled the first couple with a Forstner, but working overhead is kinda tough on my arthritic shoulders, I was hoping a spade bit would make it go quicker and easier.
B.
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<...snipped...>

I was doing this same job a few years ago and used a holesaw. If you get a good quality saw like a Morse or Starret, they have slots that make it fairly easy to remove the plug.
Actually, I was replacing a section of rain gutter. We had had insualtion blown into the attic the previous year and I wanted to install soffit vents, so I figured while I was climbing up the ladder (about 26 ft to the soffets) I'd do both jobs at the same time. I can tell you, climbing up and down that ladder, moving it a few feet each time gets old. Anyway, as I neared an end I had one hole left to drill in the gutter. I removed the holesaw from my to switch to a plain twist drill but I dropped it. Damn! I did NOT want to o down and up that ladder even one more time!
I looked at that holesaw, with it's pilot bit sticking out about 3/8" or whatever past the saw teeth, and thought to myself, "Sure I can drill through the aluminum gutter real careful like, stop the drill as soon as it breaks through, install the last gutter hanger, and I'll be done."
Well, the pilot drill went through the aluminum but I was not successful at stopping the drill in time. The hole saw hit the gutter, snagged on it, tore off a 2 foot section, twisted around, and damn near pulled me off the ladder. I think it was right after that that I bought a second cordless drill.
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snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net () wrote in
*snip*

It's worthwhile to buy a second cheap cordless drill. I got an 18V one for $20-30 that's not very high quality, doesn't always spin true (I think the bit's more the problem than the chuck/motor), etc, but it does do a decent job drilling holes.
The other thing that comes to mind is when on a ladder you want a tool belt with a drill holster. It's just so much easier to keep stuff like that on you when you're working at 4', then 6', then 8' etc.
Puckdropper
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Buddy Matlosz wrote:
> I need to drill a series of vent holes in the plywood soffit that was > recently replaced under my garage roof. I drilled the first couple with a > Forstner, but working overhead is kinda tough on my arthritic shoulders, I > was hoping a spade bit would make it go quicker and easier.
Given your application, definitely would NOT suggest a hole saw or a spade bit.
Since you already have the forstner bit and the drill, find an 18 year old to do the drilling.
Lew
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Yeah, then I can drill HER afterwards - helluvan idea!
B.
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Buddy Matlosz wrote:
> Yeah, then I can drill HER afterwards - helluvan idea!
Works for me.
Lew
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wrote:

Put her on top.. easier on the shoulder.. lol
Also remember to be there holding the ladder..
Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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Seems to me to be an ideal application for a hole saw. Using a Forstner to make through-holes in plywood seems to me to be a waste of energy.
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J. Clarke wrote:
> Seems to me to be an ideal application for a hole saw. Using a Forstner to > make through-holes in plywood seems to me to be a waste of energy.
Normally I would agree, but in this application, you are standing on a ladder drilling overhead without the benefit of a right angle drill.
A 2" hole saw is going to bind during cutting.
When it does, your wrists and hands will thank you if you are using a right angle drill.
If you are using a straight drill, you are going to wish you hadn't.
It is strictly a safety issue.
Lew
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I'd also be VERY glad that my drill/driver has a clutch... I've dug in hole saws before and had the torque effect the clutch instead of my wrist... (that's a good thing *g* )
Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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Hope you're planning to place screened louvers in those holes to keep the rodents and hornets out. Two inch sounds a bit small. Should not the total flow area of the soffit vents approximately equal the exhaust flow area of the gable or ridge vents. A two inch spade bit in a hand held power drill at the top of a ladder might just wrench those arthritic shoulders sufficiently to help you forget all about soffits. I suspect that the bit manufacturers' liability lawyers have thought of that and decided not to market very large spade bits.
How about some standard, screened, 6x12" soffit louvers installed over correctly sized cutouts made with a jigsaw in the hands of a younger, insured person. Medical costs are really high these days.
David Merrill

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total
I didn't want to go into this much detail, but I guess there's no choice now. I couldn't find a good picture or plan of the way this garage is constructed, but this photo of a lean-to shed gives a pretty good idea:
http://how-to-plans.com/lean_to_shed_plans.html
My garage is constructed and attached to the house just like the shed in the picture, but has a footprint of about 12' x 24'. The roof has an even shallower angle than the one shown, it's almost flat. Inside the garage, the ceiling consists of sheet rock attached directly to the roof joists, there are no rafters (hope I'm using the right terms). The house is about 60 years old, the garage was an add-on and I don't know the age.
I really didn't know much about roof ventilation until after I started this thread and started to research it. I know now that soffit vents are intended to be used in conjunction with gable, ridge, or roof vents, but in this design there's no place to put them. Any suggestions? There was originally no ventilation provided, is it even required in this roof design?
Buddy
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I don't know. Did a little searching; found this: http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t 6153 http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t 5770 http://forum.doityourself.com/archive/index.php/f-11-p-3.html Hope it helps.
Are you seeing signs of water or sun damage that causes you to consider the possible need for ventilation? Or, is this one of those "if it isn't broken, don't fix it" situations? Do you live in an area with a building code inspector who is familiar with local conditions and might be willing to answer this question?
David Merrill

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the
to
Here's the history: I bought the house about 6 years ago. Shortly after, I noticed water stains on the garage ceiling. I had a new roof put on by a co-worker who moonlights in home repairs, I really don't know well-qualified he is. Two years ago I noticed more leaks. The roof was removed and replaced by my then 19-yo son. He'd been doing carpentry, roofing and repairs for a couple of years, and is a neophyte, but was working with an older friend who seemed more knowledgeable. Now fast-forward to last month - another leak appeared, my son determined that there was a spot where the garage roof meets the house wall that wasn't tarred properly, and touched it up. At that time, we noticed some water damage and rotting along the fascia and soffit. He said that was probably caused by the previous guy not installing a drip edge, which my son and his friend did later. He then tore out and replaced the fascia/soffit. It was then that I questioned why the soffit on the house had vents, but the garage soffit didn't. Sonny suggested adding the vents, but again, I'm not sure I trust his judgement. The house, BTW, has a full attic with gable vents in addition to soffit vents.
I'll look into your suggestion about the building inspector. Those links are great, I'm still going through them.
Thanks, David.
Buddy
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Buddy Matlosz wrote:
> Here's the history: <snipped for brevity>
Let us see, there was a poor flashing job and no drip cap installed.
Either one can cause problems.
The "attic" above the ceiling of this garage needs some ventilation to prevent condensation problems.
Someplace there is a formula of how much vent area is required based on square footage of ceiling involved, but I have long ago forgotten where to look to find it.
Maybe somebody in the insulation business can help.
Think it is time to break out the saber saw and cut some rectangular holes to accept standard soffit vents.
Lew
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