Kreg pocket holes not drilling cleanly

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Ah. I should have made clear that I have the Kreg Jr. K3 jig, not the larger system. I do have their face clamp, which keeps it nice and steady.
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In article

Make sure the bit is spinning FAST.
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I'm a novice to the Kreg jig as well, and just figured it was the "nature of the beast." The dozen and a half I drilled for my last project cleaned up really nicely with some 220 grit paper in a palm sander.
Maybe a few of the tricks that work for other things would help here. Tape, perhaps? Or maybe a thin piece of wood placed over the place where you're drilling so the ragged edge occurs on the piece rather than the work piece?
Puckdropper
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Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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If I ever use pocket hole s even inside a cabinet, I'd like them to be a little neater.
Good form would dictate that pocket holes are only on the back side of face frames and other non-visible locations of cabinets. They do sell the plugs but that is kind of cheesy and you should just use a better joint.
I did use them on to connect the upper bookshelf sides, down to the counter top of lower cabs on some built-ins. I considered plugs but just ended up covering them with some thin trim that looks like some perfectly natural interior base molding.
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On 8/20/12 5:48 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

I agree... even with plugs, these are something not to be seen. I used them on the outer surface of the cabinet in my bathroom(s) remodel but they are invisible, because that surface is painted. Point being, it's not really something to worry about since they are either on unseen surfaces or the fuzz will be sanded off during paint prep.
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I cannot recall ever using them where I was worried about the looks of the hole edges... either it was rough work where I didn't care period, or it was concealed by later work. If appearance matters I use mortise and tenon or handcut dovetails... To some degree I have lately used corrugated fasteners where I formerly would have used Kreg screws... keep things together to assist in assembly and/or hold hidden pieces together while the glue holding plywood skins dried. But that's me...
John
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Greg Guarino wrote:

Any rotating cutter will tend to tear/lift/fuzz the grain on the exit side especially when cutting cross grain. The only way to avoid it is to completely back up the edge...think router and edge grain where you use a sacrificial block.
You can mitigate it to a greater or lesser extent by toughening the wood surface where it is going to tear or fuzz. On a saw, masking tape helps a bit, not likely to help in your case. You can also score it. For you, the easiest/best(?) way would to spray on a coat of lacquer and let it dry well before drilling. Hardly worth the bother given the ease of knocking off the fuzz with sandpaper if it bothers you.
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1. Use a good 3/8 "corded" drill, battery drills just don't spin up fast enough for a clean hole. 2. Have a good sharp bit. 3. Cross grain will cause a little fuzzy edges at times. 4. Use the dust collector if your model supports it.
Your picture appears to be white pine which is tough to get a good sharp edge on.
On 8/20/2012 12:24 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

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On 8/21/2012 12:57 PM, Pat Barber wrote:

Normally I would agree but the T-15 Festool drill works well, as good as my stand by DeWalt with a tail with no noticeable speed deterioration under load.

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On 8/21/12 12:57 PM, Pat Barber wrote:

Good advice except it depends on the cordless drill. I have 4 cordless drills. 2 aren't fast enough, 2 are plenty fast enough.
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On 8/21/2012 11:58 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

At one point, the Kreg site made a statement that the corded drill is the preferred tool for making holes. I have always used my 3/8 Makita with excellent results. I have used my Makita cordless with "similar" but not as good results.
In a little training session at the spring woodworking show in Charlotte, the Kreg rep used a cordless drill with pretty damn good results.
Your mileage and holes may be different with any drill.
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On 8/23/12 12:41 PM, Pat Barber wrote:

I'm sure they do recommend corded drills. Until very recently, most cordless drills were much slower. They also slowed down as the batteries got weaker. So even if they were fast enough at the start, they weren't fast enough for half your holes.
LIon batteries don't slow down, they just stop, so that problem is fading away (pun).
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Lion batteries can't handle heat. e.g. when the shop gets hot, the battery is failing. They are great in room temp places.
I got a wrench and a screwdriver / allen wrench unit. The wrench was a nice socket set type - that died in the summer or the winter.
I think the heat broke the seal and the cold finished it off. The other wrench was in the house and gets use now and then.
Martin
On 8/23/2012 10:20 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

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On 8/24/12 9:33 PM, Martin Eastburn wrote:

How freakin hot is your shop? I'm pretty sure ambient temperature has to get well over 120 degrees before it affects performance.
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Any heat is bad for batteries. Chemical processes go something like the square of the temperature, doubling every 10C. I always keep them in the house during the summer. My garage (and attic where most of my tools are) can *easily* get to 120F in the summer. It'll be much nicer in the basement of the new place. ;-)
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On 8/24/12 11:17 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

I'm pretty sure he didn't mean storage, maybe he did. In any case, like you pointed out, heat like that is going to effect any battery. I've been working with battery powered tools, and audio/video equipment for 30 years and I've been through most of the evolution and had a lot of experience with every generation/technology. I'll take LiIon over any of them, up until this point. Whatever is down the creek will probably be better.
Every time a newer battery chemistry comes out, there are naysayers and they complain about this, that, and the other, when in fact, the new stuff is always better, almost without exception.
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For many tasks LiIon is the best, though NiCd still has its place.

When it first appears, not so much. LiIon (which isn't just one "technology") certainly had its teething pains. NiMH looked like a sure winner but today its only real advantage is its "greeness" (nickel is about as benign as you can get).
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On 8/25/12 12:16 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Not for me. NiCad was better than the previous generation of batteries, but just barely. NiCads couldn't go away fast enough in my book. I can't think of a single use for which I would prefer NiCad batteries... except maybe ballast under my buffing wheel. :-)
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Sometimes it is the execution of the technology. I had a NiCad 9.6V battery-driven Sears (yeah, I know) drill/driver (973.274960) that couldn't hold a charge. I had the 2 sets of batteries rebuilt by Primecell in March '11, and now it holds charge really fine. The old charger works with them. Not an especially fast high powered drill, but now the batteries work fine. It was cheaper (but maybe not that much) than buying a new drill.
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Lookign at what they want for rebuilds now, I don't think they are cheaper than buying new tools. :-(
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