Jointer or Planer

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A question to the group. Given a choice to buy a new tool, what would you buy first, a jointer or a thickness planer? Thanks for any suggestions.
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wrote:

If I could buy only one, it would be the planer: - with proper jigs and fixtures, you can face-joint on a planer - with proper jigs and fixtures, you can edge-joint on a table saw - ain't no way you can thickness-plane anything on a jointer.
If you can buy both, do so.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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says...

Joiner. Many, many more uses for a joiner.
S.
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Yeah that was helpful. And he is asking about a joinTer not a joiner.
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Planer
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I got a combi unit. I don't know if you can get one in the US anymore though. Mine was a Makita planer and jointer. Not a helpful answer.
I would choose a planer first. I can get a straight edge on a board with a hand plane to rough in and a table saw. Or a router and straight edge.
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On Jul 25, 2:20?pm, Jim Behning

Admittedly I have never felt the need for a planer. But if I had to reduce stock from, say, 3/4" to 1/2" I would just run it a number of times over my jointer until I got there. Anything wrong with that approach?
FoggyTown
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FoggyTown wrote:

Not if the two surfaces wind up parallel. They often don't.
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dadiOH
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Yep. You don't have any reference surface to ensure that opposite faces remain parallel to each other -- you're almost guaranteed to taper the board in at least one dimension.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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wrote:

Except your scribe line, just as you would use to hand plane. No problem. Matter of fact, you can also plan your work as the old boys who had nothing in the way of power tools to work with, and make precise thickness unnecessary.
If you buy unplaned lumber, planer's a good choice, given the easier workarounds for edging. Otherwise your board width is limited, for practical purposes, to the width of your jointer knives.
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Have you ever actually done that? Seems to me that it would be awfully hard to see the scribe line, what with the blade guard on the side toward you, and the fence on the side away.

Yes, of course you can. You can also get to the grocery store in a horse and buggy, too, and some folks still do.

Not really -- rip with a bandsaw, joint, glue up. Not perfect, of course, but some would prefer that, to jointing and planing a 15"-wide board by hand.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Yes, I have, and the line is as visible as the one on the opposite edge of the board I'm hand planing.
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George wrote:

> Yes, I have, and the line is as visible as the one on the opposite edge

If I could do it all over again, the very first woodworking skill I would have learned would have been sharpening.
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FoggyTown wrote:

Don't you want parallel faces?
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Sure I do! But the issue turns on a a question of scale. What degree of tapering and on what size stock? If I'm 1/32nd out on a 6' x 6" x 1" plank I'm not going to get too fussed. If I'm 1/16th out on a 12" X 2" x 1/2" board then there could be a problem. The tolerances for a king sized bed aren't the same as for a jewelry box.
FoggyTown
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FoggyTown wrote:

If you can use a jointer (machine) to plane two parallel surfaces to within 1/32" over 6'', you are extremely talented, and lucky.
I doubt many who are considering which machine to purchase first could come close.
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wrote:

Yes, you have no reference to insure uniform thickness. Not totally unlike ripping a board on a TS with out a rip fence. It can be done but not consistently accurately.
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Sparky wrote:

As you see, you get a difference of opinion...
I'll go along w/ both w/ "depends"... :)
On what your work habits are and what your more pressing need is.
They are, imo, complementary and for the work I do and the stock I use, I wouldn't want to be without either.
_But_, if I were forced to choose one only, I would probably take the jointer initially. I say that based on the fact that was the way I started and I did get along. That time was, of course, long before the day of the large router and I didn't have a tablesaw but a RAS at the time so edges were more problematical other than all neanderthal...
On the "jointing" by planer, I suppose one can manage w/ enough gyrations and jigs, etc., but isn't very effective imo. The planer feed rolls will mash anything thin flat as it goes through, so unless the board is flat but just two faces out of parallel, it won't help much on getting an initial surface. It's possible to shim and all, but far more work. Again, this is tempered by having an old "heavy iron" planer, not one of the modern lightweight guys -- it may be their roller pressure isn't so likely for a larger class of stock, I don't know.
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Not the answer you're looking for but if I had to do it all over my first buy would have been a good radial arm saw. No, not the Craftsman but something like a heavy duty Delta or DeWalt. If you have the right attachments, you could do most everything including crosscut, rip, plan, sand, mold, etc.
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These are very different tools. It depends on the projects you want to build. I use my jointer with my table saw, and need that more than a thickness planer. One is not a substitute for the other.
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