Jointer expectations from the mill?

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Sorry, but what do you mean by "arguing over interpretations"? What's to interpret about "jointed"? Either stock has been jointed straight and flat, or it has not. S2S lumber is in the latter category.
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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wrote:

Maybe I should have said expectations.
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wrote:

Bill:
I believe that what you really wanted is what is called SLR1E in the lumber trade.
This stands for Straight Line Ripped One Edge and is the creation of a reference edge for sitting against your table saw fence.
This allows you to cut a line parallel to the ripped edge, so that you wind up with a board of equal width throughout its length.
They don't actually use a jointer to do this jointing but use a straight line ripping saw to cut the straight line.
Lumber terminology can be confusing. S2S usually means planing both faces of the board to a given dimension. You may also specify that it only be skip planed to a given dimension, which may give you hollows on one or both faces.
S4S is used as a designation in softwood rendering and produces dimension lumber, such as 2x4 and 2x6 etc.
When I was ordering a lot of hardwood lumber for my shop I would buy it skip planed to 13/16" with one face flat and an edge done SLR1E.
This gave me a reference edge for the table saw and a reference for the planing. I didn't want the rough planers that the yard used to bring my sticks any closer to final thickness because my little lunchbox planer, with me paying close attention to grain direction and depth of cut, could produce a far nicer face.
Regards,
Tom Watson
tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email)
http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
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"Tom Watson" wrote in message

Just to add to that ... some hardwood dealers sell hardwoods S4S to those willing to pay the generally high price so as not to have to mill it themselves, as well as S4S hardwoods is all the BORG's sell in their generally meager hardwood inventory.

A valuable practice for a man who has learned the art of buying hardwoods.

Again, just to add to that: Skip planing, or "hit n' miss" as we call it down here, can also give the hardwood lumber buyer a reasonable idea of the figure and suitability when choosing wood for a project before he leaves the lumber yard.
I recommended S2S1E to the OP, because if learns how to pick his lumber, learning that art with both sides surfaced until he gets the hang of it, he has much better chance of satisfaction than he had previously received when ordering his lumber "jointed", including the convenience being able to rip to width and planing to thickness with the tools he already owned.
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www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/29/06
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So you recommend to the guy who does NOT have a jointer that he should STOP buying jointed lumber, and instead buy lumber that has NOT been jointed, so that when he planes to thickness he's now referencing against an UNjointed face when previously he had been referencing against a jointed (and therefore flat) face.
And you claim he'll have better satisfaction and convenience.
I'm beginning to wonder if you even know what a jointer is for.
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Nov 11, 7:43 am, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote: <snip>
You're right, Doug, and have been right throughout this thread. That said, I think it's time to move on.
JP
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