Joining the CNC club!

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Ordered the smaller CNC shark. For the type of stuff I do the small one is going to work fine, and will actually fit in the shop. I was going to put a planer in that spot but this is going to be way more fun :) I don't even want to think about how much more I'm going to have to spend (time & money) to get full use out of it though...
Now I have to go build a cabinet for it...
-Kevin
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Congrats, those things are a blast!
Can you say: "Slippery slope?"
Hey MORRIS!! We got another one!! Bwuahahahaha *diabolical laughter*
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On Wed, 25 Nov 2009 09:57:48 -0800 (PST), the infamous Robatoy

Now that he's hooked, it won't be long before he's here: http://fwd4.me/63N , or even here: http://fwd4.me/63K
-- Q: How many climate scientists does it take to change a light bulb?
A: None. There's a consensus that it's going to change, so they've decided to keep us in the dark.
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wrote:

In all seriousness... what else are going to buy for $60K that does as much as that does? (Aside from the fact that a $ 30K machine will almost do it all.) Football, Ballet...
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Robatoy wrote:

How good can they be? Neither of those machines can spin a rubber chicken!
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Not to piss on anyone's Wheaties....
I've seen these sub-$5k cnc machines at woodcraft and woodworking shows and the results always look pretty lousy. I can only describe it as woodworking's equivalent to the dot-matrix printer.
To those who know, those who've used them.... I ask, are they doing something wrong that makes the "carving" look so cheap? Are there some sort of resolution settings on the machine or are they using too soft of wood or what?
Like I said, I'm not trying to be a jerk, I honestly want to know. I've considered the possibility of using one to carve a logo in drum shells. But if they would end up looking like the samples I've seen at their displays, no thanks.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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-MIKE- wrote:

The cause of crummy results /may/ be the machine, but it can also be the software used to produce the part program, or it could be poor set up on the part of the operator - or it could be any combination of the above.
My ShopBot is good for about +/- 0.0015" accuracy. For the guys making signs or turning sheets of plywood into kitchen cabinets, that seems to be adequate, but when I started in on CNC joinery I wasn't happy (I was sufficiently unsatisfied that I built a wooden CNC machine just for joinery with a step size of 1/4800" which seems to be about right for my purposes.)
My suggestion is to ask to see the machine produce some work of the quality you're after. If their machine can't do it, then walk away but don't stop looking.
If you're adventurous and enjoy a challenge, design and build your own machine (it's not as difficult as you might imagine, and it's a lot less expensive than an off-the-shelf product).
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Morris Dovey wrote:

Oh geez, you had to go there.
I answer "yes" to both of those, but I'm on too many adventures, right now. :-)
--

-MIKE-

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-MIKE- wrote:

Yabbut just imagine - you could turn out precision router base plates whenever you wanted. :-))
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Morris Dovey wrote:

Oh, can you fit an adjustable hole cutter in a cnc chuck? :-)
Do they have a chainsaw attachment for mortising fence posts?
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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You betcha! A bit buzzy at 22,000 revs, but that smooths right out when it plunges into 3" worth of oak.
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Robatoy wrote:

All kidding aside, I'm thinking seriously about chucking mine up in the 'Bot to cut check valve flapper disks from aluminum pop cans (at probably ~100 RPM). Should be an interesting experiment...
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Morris Dovey wrote:

What do you used those for?
--

-MIKE-

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-MIKE- wrote:

I'm working on a non-electrical solar pump to supply water for folks in under-developed areas. One of the outstanding problems is a DIY-able check valve that seals decently.
If interested you can see what I have so far at
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/Projects/Stirling/5mPump2.html
(the drawing is only of the engine/pump without the solar heat source)
If the pop can flapper works out, I'd kinda like to send out "show-n-tell" check valves to the volunteer R&D teams so they'll have some to play with (and improve upon) :)
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Morris Dovey wrote:

I've seen your pump, I try to check in now and then to see how things are going.
I'm trying to build a shock for my out-feed table, so I can just let it go and it will glide down to its latch.
I tried a screen door closer, but those have a spring that gives quite a bit of resistance on the open throw.
I was thinking of some pvc water pipe and a check valve stopper of some kind. Maybe I could steal one from a bike tire pump.
--

-MIKE-

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-MIKE- wrote:

Hmm - when I dropped in on a guy who's done some machining for me, he was rebuilding some auto and motorcycle struts. I wonder if a worn-out strut might be a good solution for you.
If not, I'd think that a UHMWPE or delrin piston with a "pop can" flapper would work with your PVC pipe approach...
...and if it works well enough that the table takes more than an hour to lower itself, you should send photos. :-D
--
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DeSoto Solar
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Morris Dovey wrote:

LOL, literally. :-)
My first approach was simply a wood cylinder that fit as tight as it could into pvc, with a cap on the end. The air escaping around the wood provided a decent pad, but it was the same in both directions.
--

-MIKE-

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On Sat, 28 Nov 2009 12:45:31 -0600, the infamous -MIKE-

You could either:
1) Install relief valves (one-way check valve) in it to let the air out during the outward stroke, as you put up the table.
or
2) Bore out the major length of the cylinder a bit larger, all but the final several inches. When the table comes out, the piston quickly hits the larger bore and that produces no damping. As you drop it, it glides down until the piston hits the tight cylinder and starts damping so it doesn't slam.
-- Some days, it's not even worth chewing through the restraints.
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Larry Jaques wrote:

I like that one.
--

-MIKE-

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Think automotive scrapyard. Hatchback gas cylinders van be had for next-to-nothing, Even new replacement ones at your PartBoys are sometimes reasonable. The dampening amount varies with the angle you mount it on. Some of them exert serious spring tension.... be careful.
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