Is There a Max Board Length for Jointer?

Page 2 of 2  
Larry Jaques wrote:

It's not the same thing, but.... I have a electric hand-held planer and I'm better at using it *without* the little fence guide that came with it. It just seems to get in the way. I can feel and see the surface getting flat. I suppose one gets the same feeling, probably stronger, from hand planing.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
-MIKE- wrote:

...
There had better be no snipe on a jointer--if there is, the knives aren't set correctly wrt to the outfeed table or there is too much downforce on the workpiece directly over the cutterhead at the end of the pass.
Even w/ very long work that's up to the verge of what can physically deal with, one should be able to get a clean edge that will match edges over the entire length including the ends. (That's where the effect of long-term experience/familiarity/practice I mentioned previously really comes to the fore when pushing the limits, of course...)
Snipe should be a problem relegated only to planers...
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dpb wrote:

You're correct about that. Even the manual for this jointer refers to that in the section about setting the height of the blades. Since I'm used to running one edge through the jointer, then moving to the planer to get the other edge parallel, I still leave it longer than finished length.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
-MIKE- wrote: ...

YIKES!!!! You're running stuff thru the planer _on_EDGE_!!??? Now that _IS_ scary.
That's what ripping's for on the TS. W/ a planer ripping blade and saw set up well, you should be able to glue directly from there. Or, at worst, a single skinch cut on the jointer.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dpb wrote:

Never had a problem, probably because I'm not running one at a time.
If I have five or six boards I want at the same exact width, I run them all through side by side. I'm not talking 8" wide, here. Generally 2" and under, like cabinet stock.
You know how they can look the same and measure the same, but when you set them together, and run your finger across, you can feel they aren't exact? That gets them exact for me.
Keep in mind, this is technique developed by someone who didn't have a good table saw.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/06/2009 08:34 AM, dpb wrote:

Within reason. Due to the basic geometry of a jointer and the fact that wood compresses slightly, once you start getting significantly longer than the bed length the accuracy starts to drop.
As a thought experiment, imagine passing a 10' board over a jointer with a 10" bed length.
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

given high enough strength holddowns over the outfeed table, wouldn't it still work? the end of the board may sag, but the part of the board just past the cutters should still be on the table so the cut would be accurate. if the board is high enough, the tension in the board could even hold it straight without support.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
charlie wrote:
...

...
I'm "thoughting" skyhook... :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
scrawled the following:

What a perfect time to buy a new tool! They'll also help you stack your lumber piles, move machine tools, etc.
http://www.roxburyauto.com/machines/Forklifts/IR-VR642B.html
-- "To compel a man to subsidize with his taxes the propagation of ideas which he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical." -- Thomas Jefferson
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/06/2009 12:19 PM, charlie wrote:

Possibly...but who has powerful holddowns on their jointer? My hands are my holddowns, and given that they're also moving to push the stock through there's no way that I can be sufficiently accurate to give good results in really long stock.
Personally, I find it really easy to joint stock that is the length of the outfeed table. This ensures that a concave board can ride on the low points at all times. Once the stock gets longer than the outfeed table, then you need to care a bit more about technique but it still works. So far I haven't had to go much more than about 1.5x the length of the bed. I wouldn't want to go much more than 2x the length of the bed, and for something like that I'd probably knock off the high points with a handplane first anyways.
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 06 Nov 2009 12:06:33 -0600, Chris Friesen wrote:

A rule I heard a long time ago was that the max length equaled the total length of the jointer. Another version was twice the length of the infeed table.
In any case, if the edge is warped very much, I make a few partial passes to bring it closer to flat before running a full length pass.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I successfully edge jointed 12 foot pine boards on my Reliant 6" jointer when I had it... face jointing was another issue due to board sag. Using the term loosely, the beam strength of the wood on edge was adequate to keep the board straight where as it wasn't for face jointing. The other problem is the weight of the board. I had the Reliant leaning over with the outfeed table tilted towards the ground one time with a long heavy board. Guess I should have bolted the machine down!
Problems diminished somewhat when I got the 8" DJ-20. The tables are about twice as long as the Reliant's were and the machine base is much longer. Combined with much greater weight I've never tipped this jointer even when running 6x6x10s over it.
I think the real question in choosing how big of a machine to buy is what are you going to use the jointer for. If you are making furniture you seldom use boards over 4 feet long but may need more width (I think this is where the combo jointer/planners shine). If you are making face frames for built ins 8 footers may be more common for length but you may not need as much width. If you are doing architectural work, e.g., initial jointing prior to running through a molder to make 16 foot or longer oak crown molding then you need a heavy long bed jointer for stability and support. I'd think a power feed with outfeed support may let you get away with a bit smaller machine but bigger is almost always better.
The other consideration is you just need to get the board straight and flat enough for good support in the thickness planner and/or table saw. After the jointer saw or plane the opposite side/edge, and the flip it over and do the jointed edge/face. You don't have to get every last bit of the face jointed nor every last bit of the edge. As such, perfection off the jointer isn't necessary.
I figured out a long time ago that I should buy the biggest tool I can afford as I always end up pushing things to the limit--like tilting the Reliant. This reality is why I've got a 36" bandsaw sitting on the side while I renovate my wood shed to hold it. The 18" bandsaw just isn't big and robust enough...
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

YOU! are a wood working GOD.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

More like I had enough body weight and strength at the time to keep it tight on the table.
Being older and lighter now I'm not sure I could pull it off today... another reason for bigger tools. ;~)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John Grossbohlin wrote:

Ayup...
At one time 30-something years ago I did a 7-ft oak bookcase on the first 4" Craftsman machine I had. I could do those easily on the present Crescent as they'll sit on either table comfortably. On the little Craftsman they were on the borderline of the "tilt-that-sucker" point.
I've some old 20-ft Doug fir tuba-10 & -12 material in the barn loft left over from when we built the grain bins in the loft for the feed mill back in the late 50s. I can't bring myself to cut one of them for anything, but I have thought of jointing an edge and using them as an exhibit set of shelving for a bunch of the antique tools, bits of tack/harness, etc., etc., that have collected since the git-go. I don't I could do them even if Crescent were a 20"-er instead of just 12"... :)
Hadn't thought about that random thought for some years since we uncovered the stack of them while doing the restoration work on it after the roofing was completed. That might just have to be a winter project...
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, once they get to be a 1/4 mile long, it becomes problematic. Curvature of the earth can be a bitch.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Maxwell Lol wrote:

My outfeed and infeed extension are 1500 meters, so I should be ok.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.