Installing (2002) Delta TS

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Leon wrote:

Yes, that's most-surely what led to my confusion about the way a 240v circuit works... So, a 240v circuit apparently doesn't have a direction....or rather, it has 2 directions at the same time, from one leg to another, and vice-versa.
Bill
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On Thursday, June 9, 2016 at 4:58:37 PM UTC-5, Bill wrote:

...half of your 120 volt circuits would be out of phase with the other half. And there are 120 direction changes (60 cycles) in one second.
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Bob Villa wrote:

I get it! Thanks! Am I the only one here who didn't know that? :)
Bill
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On Thursday, June 9, 2016 at 7:55:57 PM UTC-5, Bill wrote:

Me. I'm probably qualified for an honorary degree in Electrical Ignorance.
Sonny
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On Thursday, June 9, 2016 at 7:55:57 PM UTC-5, Bill wrote:

tage

Not

t

ersa.

half. And there are 120 direction changes (60 cycles) in one second.

( ͡~ ͜ʖ ͡°)
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On 6/9/2016 7:55 PM, Bill wrote:

No, most don't get it, just regurgitating something they have googled. ;~)
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wrote:

It is, really, except that the two circuits are out of phase, so they add (if they were in-phase, they'd subtract).

Yes, on the pole, and the neutral is brought into the panel. However, there is no neutral in this (240V) circuit. It's not needed because the saw doesn't use 120V (if wired for 240V).
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krw wrote:

That comment makes me wonder whether you really understand--as well as Bob Villa has explained it.

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wrote:

Wonder about what? What I said is correct, with a possible niggle about "circuits" (without the neutral there is only one).
Frankly, I didn't understand "( ?~ ?? ?°)". ;-)
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krw wrote:

The flow of electricity in the 240v versus 120v circuits (feel free to show me that I'm wrong, and I'll be the first to admit it).

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wrote:

First off there is a single phase, a 240v circuit needs no neutral.
The potential of the two legs is 180 degrees different to cause that potential.
A 120v circuit require a neutral return path.
If you have two signals that are 180 degrees out of phase they cancel each other. That would be a two phase system and you only have one.
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On Friday, June 10, 2016 at 9:11:36 AM UTC-5, Markem wrote:


The "potential" is a voltage term. The 2 "hot" wires are in phase for 240 s ingle phase. If you took 2 120 Volt circuits from the same side of the pane l (in phase) black to black, white to white...you would have effectively, t he same circuit at 120 V. 240 out of phase? Not sure of the consequences of that!
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Bob Villa wrote:

Don't they call that a "run" (of outlets, say)?
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wrote:

You may want to put a 30A breaker on it. In any case, be sure the breaker you use is "listed" for the wire you're using.
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On 6/8/2016 2:07 PM, Bill wrote:

Have at it, you're set to make sawdust ... no further need for bits and bytes.
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
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On Thursday, June 9, 2016 at 7:19:16 AM UTC-5, Swingman wrote:

.... Unless he's using Austrailian electricity or has a Canadian saw/sideways breaker box!?
Sonny
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wrote:

Does the Australian electricity turn the other way?
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On Thursday, June 9, 2016 at 9:12:36 PM UTC-5, krw wrote:

Ugh..., Yes!
Sonny
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Swingman wrote:

Thank you! But I rather enjoy the bits and bytes that connect me with other folks, such as yourself!
Bill
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On 6/8/16 2:05 PM, Bill wrote:

As others are pointing out, you'll be fine. Old fuses would blow with the initial spike of current when saw motor kicked on. A modern circuit breaker needs to heat up to trip (except in the case of a short) so it can't get hot enough to trip from the very short current spike of the motor's start-up.
At least that's my layman's explanation of it. :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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