Initial review of the Delta Left Tilt Unisaw w 50" Beismeyer - refurb - (LONG)

Page 2 of 2  

On Sat, 05 Nov 2005 01:15:48 GMT, Ba r r y

Well Barry, the DJ-20 was never made in the Tupelo plant. A very good machine with a unique design, however, originally manufactured at Invicta in Brazil and then moved to Taiwan.
As for the X5 band saw a serial number and details about the missing items, would be handy to determine where and when it was manufactured and what might have happened.
Frank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sorry to disappoint you Greg, but you are over 95% of the life of this thread. The amount of messages you've placed solely dedicated to the problem you've experienced with this saw exceed by far, the amount of replies anyone else has made.
You're well entitled to gripe about the difficulties you've encountered, but there comes a time where you just have to ease up or it's going to eat you alive. Take my word for it, there's far worse things that could have happened to you than having difficulties with Delta.
This is not an attack, just an observation. If you want to castigate me for it, then feel free.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Upscale said:

No attack - I agree with you. Most of the posts were made the first few days. It is now gone from here, and I've moved on. I respond to others because it is polite to answer others - well... sometimes...
But just when I think all is calm, like gum stuck to my shoe, here is a another one.... ;-)
Greg G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Upscale said:

BTW, I counted the messages. My contribution has been about 48% - many of which were simply short answers to other's posts and comments.
But I hear what you are saying... I know I'm sick of it!
Greg G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Frank Boettcher Wrote: > On Tue, 01 Nov 2005 21:41:12 -0500, wrote:

> the

Im very new to woodworking, started with a Delta Unisaw, very pleased with my decision, have called Deltas tech support a couple of times with very satisfactory results. During one of the calls I asked if the Unisaw was still made in the US, the answer was that some parts are and some arent. The person I was speaking with has worked for Delta for a little less than 20-years, used to work on a line making parts for the Unisaw, but those parts are now made overseas. I didnt ask what the parts were. From what I was told I presume there is more of a Unisaw than just a motor that is imported. Fwiw, nowhere in any of the Unisaw literature that I have seen does it say Made in America. The cardboard box that covered my brand new Unisaw (it was bolted to a pallet) is printed with Made in America of foreign and domestic parts.
--
joe2


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Frank Boettcher said:

After the summary on grinding methods, I though I would present a more practical demonstration of the surface grind. Since a saw table performs one primary purpose - to hold the wood level to the blade, at whatever angle is set, and to allow one to slide the wood along it's length to complete the saw cut - what better way to demonstrate the relative smoothness of the finish than the sound of wood being slid across it's surface. Besides, it's something I can present within the boundaries of the Internet to defend my contention.
I scrubbed one table clean with WD-40 and a gray Scotch-Brite pad till my arm went numb. I waxed it with Johnson's Paste Wax, left it to sit for 10 minutes, and buffed it off. Then I took one piece of oak and rubbed it along the tables of three different machines. The amount of effort required was directly proportional to the intensity of the sound.
The first is the infeed bed of a 2 year old 1HP Delta 6" Jointer.
http://www.thevideodoc.com/Media/JointerSnd1.wav
The second is the bed of my Jet Mini-Lathe. (Yes, I know, it's not a sliding surface for wood, but it IS milled cast iron.)
http://www.thevideodoc.com/Media/LatheSnd1.wav
The last is the table of the Unisaw.
http://www.thevideodoc.com/Media/UnisawSnd1.wav
Same settings, same recorder, same volume level. No alterations were performed on the resulting recordings.
http://www.thevideodoc.com/Media/SetupSnd1.wav
What is your conclusion concerning the roughness of the table?
I'm really not trying to pick a fight, just point out what I consider to be a genuine concern.
Thanks,
Greg G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hey Greg... no matter what your opinion is or what your practical, personal experience is, posting your opinion or experiences here will certainly piss someone off. Absolutely no doubt.
I thought your essay was well thought out, much nicer than I would have written, and kudos to you for not mentioning the distributor/reseller that sold you the sub par saw without giving them a chance to make it right.
I don't believe I would have your patience. I am one of those overbearing jerks that wants my major purchases to be at least in the 90% range of acceptability. Regardless of your words, I am sensing some real disappointment in the product.
I hope that (especially for someone as nice as yourself) that you are treated fairly by the sellers and manufacturers.
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Same here. I've been following this and Greg's writings are informative and seem very fair.

I went through the same feelings when both my DJ-20 and X5 bands saw were missing major show-stopping parts from factory sealed packages. Neither of my tools were refurbs, either.
To Greg:
In my case, after the tool is finally made right, and eventually it will, this will fade and you will most likely have a quality tool for a long time. Hang in there, but don't hesitate to keep pushing until you're happy. In both of my cases, I started out nice, but ended up having to really push Delta to make me square. Things did NOT move quickly until I became a pain in the side.
Good luck, Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OMG... That's a *rasp* not a Unisaw table...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Maybe their blanchard grinder was broken that day and they decided to ship it without grinding.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
AL said:

Or installing and tightening all of the hardware properly...
But according the local Delta expert, (and I'm NOT being sarcastic),
</QUOTE ON> "The grind is a rotary wheel, reciprcating table grind with a wheel large enough to cover the whole table. It leaves a different profile than a blanchard grind (rotary wheel, rotary table) or an engine grind (horizontal shaft wheel over a linear feed table). " </QUOTE OFF>
And he is absolutely right. The mill pattern supports his contention.
But apparently the wheel wasn't dressed properly, or someone threw a handful of metal chips on the table when they ground this one. Maybe the equipment malfunctioned.
For all I know this thing was built by an angry drunkard who was serving out his last 2 days of notice. Who the heck knows what happened - but if it's gonna happen, it'll happen to me. :-\
Greg G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Patrick Conroy said:

Yea, I didn't expect perfection, but this was a bit much for MY $1300.
Greg G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Greg,
I'm assuming your quoting Canadian dollars which comes to about 1,000USD which is certainly a good deal when you consider used Uni's fetch an easy $800+ in Central NY - if you can find one.
As for that top don't worry about it. Once you get several coats of wax on it you'll love it. You're well within specs for flatness and it will change as the iron ages. To bad about the slight damage on the shaft but I certainly would approach the dealer with "I'll fix the problem but whatcha gonna do fer me?".
Good post,
Bob S.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
BobS said:

Don't know where on earth you would get the idea that I am in Canada. I'm WAYYY South of there... Looked for 2 years for a gnused one - couldn't find one. This was the only deal in town that didn't involve long distance shipping.

'Slight damage' doesn't cover the blade angle shaft. It's bent. The rim of the hand wheel wobbles almost an inch when rotated.

Thanks,
Greg G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Gary Parks Enterprises. He was the OEM supplier for a while for Delta. He also makes the Furnas type, Off-On switches such as on the bandsaw and jointer (DJ20).
He had some seconds for sale on ebay a couple of months ago and I bought one identical to the one on my Uni. I'm not sure of all the lingo regarding switches, but he needed to know the FLA of my motor (that I was buying the switch for) to put the correct overload relay in. Does that make it magnetic? If so, then it is.
We had a couple of very nice email exchanges. You might check ebay to see if he still has the Furnas type switches--they're perfect for router tables or to replace any cheesy switches on other cheap gear.
You will like the switch on the Uni. Just as you suggest, it is easy to hit with your knee, in fact that is how I always turn it off. Should be a good practice for the eventuality that might require an automatic response on my part.
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
LRod said:

Well, that is interesting. It tried to figure out what the heck GPE stood for, but there was no way I could get magnetic, or shutoff, or power fail, or relay out of GPE.

I believe it is, it's a fancy name for a latching relay in a box. Some of the better units sense current draw and shut off in case of overload. I've not dissected this one to determine it's features.

I have a really cheesy, failed Chinese switch on a Delta Drill Press. I'll check it out.

Cutting large sheet goods often demands alternate means of shutoff. I built a foot pedal for my other saw, but decided it was not such a good idea and removed it - even though there was an alternate shutoff as well - for blade changes and end of day power down. Hip shutdown should work fine, I'm not certain my knee would reach it.
Thanks,
Greg G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I went back to the original auction where I bought it and it plainly says magnetic control. That answers that.

Look at my reply to the "table saw switches" elsewhere for a URL to his current auction (for the mag switch above). You can post a query through that to him directly about the drill press switch.
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Eureka! I found the auction # (expired) for the one I bought: 7539744293 Again, from it you can post a query if he has any more.
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.