Inexpensive HVLP


After reading discussions in various forums, I have about decided that the HVLP unit sold by HF, Rockler, and Woodcraft would be a good investment to meet my modest and infrequent needs. But with that decision progressing toward action, I saw a Wagner Fine Spray at Lowes. Here is a link to Wagner's description of the unit: http://www.wagnerspraytech.com/Wagne...ode=Fine_Spray
It is at the same $100 price-point as the HF/Rockler/Woodcraft unit, but looks a little different cosmetically. It has a few slight advantages over the other unit (20-ft hose instead of 15, two paint cups, and a manual that looks to have been written or rewritten by someone whose first language is English). Same country of origin, but that's a pretty big country<g>. Anyone know if under the molded plastic parts, this is the same unit? Anyone have any experience with this unit?
--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I started out with this unit. It worked fine with General Finish's waterborne poly. I had orange peel when I used Hydrocote's water poly.
Ted

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
alexy wrote:

The link didn't work for me, but here's my general thoughts:
I have the HF/Rockler/Woodcraft unit and a Fuji MM4 4 stage turbine setup.
- The biggest pain about cheaper units is that they are usually "bleeder" units that will blow dust around and wrinkle wet finish with bleed air, if you're not paying attention.
- The cheaper units will MAKE you learn to properly thin finishes and learn to use a viscosity cup. As the only adjustment on the tool is fluid quantity, you must get the viscosity right for good results. This is actually a good thing for a beginner.
- The cheap units are incredibly easy to clean. This is also a good thing, because dirty guns kill results faster than a dust storm!
- Practice, practice, practice! ALWAYS test your setup on plywood or cardboard, as described in all of the books I mentioned above.
- Check out "Spray finishing" published by Taunton, as well as Jeff Jewett's and Bob Flexner's books, and JJ's homesteadfinishing.com web site.
- In my experience, solvent based lacquers, are easiest to spray and thin. With proper health and fire precautions, they aren't scary or all that bad.
- Shellac sprays better with some 100% isopropyl alchohol added to slow drying speed.
- Keep in mind that until you get lots of experience, many finishes may still need at least a light rubbing out. It's often faster to simply quickly rub it out with pumice and rottenstone, rather than continue to respray.
- Keep a small $0.29 notebook with the equipment and keep detailed notes of viscosity cup timings, finish mixing formulas, and weather info for specific products you use. You'll really appreciate this after you haven't sprayed for a while.
- Stick with the same brand of thinners and other additives as the finish itself. This may or may not cost more, but will definitely ensure consistent results and 100% compatibility.
Spraying is fun, so enjoy yourself!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sorry about the bad link. Here's one that should work: http://www.wagner-group.com/portal/wagner_finespray_spray,43209,747.html

Thanks for the advice. My initial use will be for alkyd paint, if my airless is not doing the job. A fried who got an HVLP for a one-time kitchen cabinet job, but like me enjoys brushed on padded finishes on most projects, now is finding himself getting out the sprayer for more projects than he anticipated using it for.
--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
alexy wrote: > Thanks for the advice. My initial use will be for alkyd paint, if my

The Wagner looks comparable to the other low-cost units.
I have NO experience spraying alkyd paint, so I can't comment on what kind of job any of the units will do.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
B A R R Y wrote:
> > The Wagner looks comparable to the other low-cost units.
Didn't know any better, bought a Wagner unit along with a heat gun in a package from Home Depot.
At least the heat gun worked.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I haven't seen this Wagner HVLP in the HD I frequent--only their airless guns. What were the problems you experienced with this sprayer? Inquiring minds want to know (before plunking down hard-earned cash!)
--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
alexy wrote:
> I haven't seen this Wagner HVLP in the HD I frequent--only their > airless guns. What were the problems you experienced with this > sprayer?
Don't remember the model, might not have even been HVLP, it was a LONG time ago.
Wagner is never a consideration anymore.
SFWIW, HF is advertising an HVLP unit for less than $15.
Not a HF fan, but if it works only one time, you get $15 worth.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks, Lew. Sounds like your gripe is with Wagner in general, not this sprayer. I know nothing about their general reputation, although their marketing seems more aimed at painters than woodworkers/funiture makers/ cabinetmakers. I wonder if others have the same impression of Wagner.

No compressor here, so it is a lot more than $15 for me<g>.

Yep. I'm not generally a fan of cheap tools either, but sometimes one is all you need, and the price difference is better spent on wood or a nice dinner!
--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I am not one to throw away tools, but the Wagner paint sprayer I bought in the late 1980s was used once, put away for a couple years (until the painful memory had faded). I then used it a second time and a few minutes into the project I threw it in the trash. I believe it was called a Power Painter or something like that. It definitely was NOT an HVLP, it was a little airless POS, but had been advertised extensively (and still is) showing easy painting of garage doors, outside chairs, etc. Based on that item alone I will never trust or buy another Wagner brand painting tool.
Dave Hall
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I bought one of their early power rollers. You used a viscosity cup to get the right thickness, put the can of paint in the contraption, and it pumped the paint to a roller. Darn thing worked great. I've used it to paint some 6-8 houses (not rooms, houses) with my neighbor over the years. Darn thing will work you to death on the ceilings. 15 minutes per gallon applied, and darn near zero splatter. A great machine for the money.
On the other hand, I have one of the sprayers also. If it was bigger it could be filled with cement and used as a boat anchor. I've used it to help a buddy put two coats on his house. We should have brushed it on.
Regards, Roy

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
B A R R Y wrote:

Try this one: http://www.wagner-group.com/portal/wagner_finespray_spray,43209,747.html
--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN
mschnerdatcarolina.rr.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.