I did SO Google Dado blades!

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B A R R Y wrote:

The pictures are nice.
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Most pro's don't change a fast way to a slower way because WoodSmith shows a novice how to achieve good results with cheaper tools.
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... snip

+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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Things change. A fairly extensive review this year put Freud and Forrest at the top of the heap. I can't remember the precise details, but their cutting performance was very close and excellent for both.
I bought the Freud 8" dial setup shortly after the review.
-Steve
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Infinity Dadonator 8" set. Excellent cut quality and good value for money Review > http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com/reviews/infinitydadonator.htm
--
Regards,

Dean Bielanowski
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Freud dial a dado hands down. Great cut, and easy to dial in very nice fitting dados. I can set mine up on the first try using a digital slide mic on my stock. .004 per clik. Excelent investment.

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And how do you handle the slightly convex curve left at the bottom of the dado which is common with dial dados?
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wrote:

I don't have one, I haven't used one, I've never even looked at one, so you might regard my answer as potentially suspect. However, my understanding is that unlike a "wobble" dado (produces some degree of convexity regardless of how many blades they wobble with) the Freud uses more of an eccentric (not the right word, but perhaps it'll conjure a vision that will suffice) washer arrangement. The outer blades stay parallel, and of course chippers overlap, just as in conventional dados, and they use the "dial-it" feature to vary the thickness of some washers. It's not a 1/4" - 15/16" omnibus dado, as I understand it--more like a fine tuning feature.
The net result should be bottoms just as flat as a fify year old barrel racer (maybe that'll conjure a vision).
They are pricy. I've also been led to believe that they are too thick to work on some saws--I don't remember which, but Crapsman comes to mind. Same reason as you usually can't use your outside washer in a full thickness setup of a conventional dado--too much hub.
Get one of the guys that actually has one to verify, amplify, or contradict whatever I said.
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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My error then. I assumed that your dial-a-dado was essentially a wobble dado and subject to the convex bottoms left by wobble dados.
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OOH! OOH! CAN I ANSWER? :)
This one doesn't work like that.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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"Upscale" wrote in message

The Freud dial set is not a wobble set and leaves a flat bottom. Quick setup, easy repeatability, and not having to futz with shims, is well worth the money if you cut a lot of dadoes.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 8/29/06
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This is NOT a woblier. Different deal entirely.
wrote in message

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wrote in message

the chipper blade. When it is dialed and cuts slightly wider, the overlap of the outer wider teeth is less. When cutting narrower, the overlap is greater. All blades rotate in a plane perpendicular to the arbor. The adjustment dial works like an adjustable width shim.
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">> And how do you handle the slightly convex curve left at the bottom of the

ago. What a exercise in frustration. When Freud came out with thier adjustable, I couldn't wait for the ww show to see it in action. I questioned the demonstrater and he answered all my questions while showing me how on the saw with the blade on the saw. Bought one right there and have not regretted the extra dollars. BTW-I was in the market for a new set and was ready to spend a couple hundred dollars on the last set I would ever buy. This one fit the bill perfectly.
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"Robatoy" wrote

Good day Rob,
I don't see Morris chiming in yet, so I'll grab this one!
I just spent some time in the shop making the parts for a clamshell bookcase (it folds up to secure all the books) for a preschool. I used my Freud dado set with the shims. While this is a much better dado set than the Craftsman "wobble" blade, it still takes far too much time as compared to the ShopBot.
Unless you are doing tons of IDENTICAL cuts, the shopbot is going to win. Accurate, infinite width adjustment, stopped dados, stepped dados ... you name it. Morris' registration rails and clamps make it much easier to cut dados on already prepared blanks, and if all the dados are on one side, you can cut your dados and then cut your parts out with the same bit in the router.
Make no mistake ... I really enjoy the ShopBot. I thought this project was going to be a very quick one; I apparently have forgotten how to judge completion times.
*****
I know the ShopBot will leave a rather large hole in your wallet ... the one I have paid for itself on the first job. If you haven't found anyone in your area that owns one, check on the ShopBot forum (www.shopbottools.com) and get in touch with someone that is willing to show you how things work. My door (near Winston-Salem, NC) is open to such visits, though it IS a bit of a commute for you.
Regards,
Rick
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$200.00 for a dado blade or several thousand for a CNC. Hard choice.

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If you look at it that way, no.
"Several thousand for a CNC" vs $200 for a dado blade, and $1700 for a Unisaw makes the economics a little closer.
If that's the way one justifies tooling costs, at least.
Patriarch
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Well stated. While a CNC router is not the "only tool you'll ever need", it sure does some jobs much better (go ahead and ask me!). Rob has been looking at CNC routers for some time now ... and I was just reminding him that this was yet another job that might be better done (expecially in volume) with a CNC router.
Regards,
Rick

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If you've got the work for them, they are the way to go (we have six). I was under the impression that he was more of a hobbyist. Don't know why I thought that other than that is mostly what makes up this group.

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CW wrote:

*boggle*
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