How to heat a 9 x 16 uninsulated shed? Suggestions sought.

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My home shop is squeezed into a 9 x 16 wood shed.
I can't do much in the winter because NJ is just too cold. I need to heat it up now and then and am looking for suggestions. I tried a small 1500 btu Pelonis electric/fan heater the other day and that was about as effective as puppies' breath.
So, any thoughts? Space is at a premium. I'm stepping around and over stuff as it is now.
I'd consider some sort of propane or kerosene heater provided it wasn't a space hog or just too much of a fire or carbon monoxide hazard.
I may be asking for the impossible.
Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
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If you can make room for it, look for a 55 gal drum stove kit (you provide the drum) it burns wood scraps, only runs when you want and in a small space could throw more heat then you loose.
AndrewV

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"AndrewV" wrote

I did that in my last shop. They 55 gallon drums were too big. But a friend was able to get me two 30 gallon drums. They worked just fine. It was a double barrel stove. That thing put out so much heat that you could use the shop for a sauna if you wanted to.
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KIMOSABE wrote: ...

... I'd start w/ some insulation -- whether it's solid foam on the walls/ceiling if there's not stud space or whatever you need to do. Then, at least you're not just trying to heat the whole eastern seaboard.
Then, a reasonably small propane or other heater (preferably vented, outside air if this is a wood shop and particularly if use volatile finishes) will be all needed.
--
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dpb wrote:

That's what I did with my 10x10 shed/shop. I insulated the sides with fibreglass and the ceiling with foam. Nothing in the floor and that's proving to be an issue.
I run a kerosene heater all winter for heat and it's good til about -15 C (5 F). Or it was last winter without insulation. I expect better results this year. I was in the shop all day today with outside temps ~ - 10 C (14 F) and I was too hot.
YMMV
Tanus
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KIMOSABE wrote:

In the past the "Modine Hot Dawg" heater have had some good reports in this news group. They come in both natural gas and propane models. The HD-30 which is rated for a 1 - 1.5 car garage would be more than enough and runs about $500. See:
http://www.gas-space-heater.com/modine-hot-dawg.html
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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more puppies? one can never have too many puppies, at least until they grow up.
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I have two kerosene heaters.
This type is good for long, sustained, even heat. It'll have you shedding layers in no time.
http://www.yourheater.com/dh2304.jpg
This type is good for heating a place up, right quick. But it's noisy, so it's not too good for sustained heating, and you wouldn't want to have anything set in front of it accidentally.
http://www.yourheater.com/images/DFA45-2004.jpg
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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first insulate the shop ,then buy an infered heating element for a twenty lb propane tank.With this you will be able to work in short sleves even in the coldest day.
Len
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Infered.... hee hee. Without implying anything, I inferred he meant infrared.
jc

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Insulating would probably be cheaper than burnings tons of fuel.
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RE: Subject
Insulate first.
Without it, it's like pushing on a rope.
Lew
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on 11/19/2008 4:14 PM Lew Hodgett said the following:

Said George Burns when asked if still had sex.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Thanks for everything.
I got the message = insulate. OK, I will.
I know those barrel heaters are great, but I just don't have the room to consider even a small one. For space/cost/btu's, the heater I've ordered the propane unit suggested by Len. I never saw one of these before. http://www.heatershop.com/propane_infrared_heaters.html
As to pushing on a rope, someone once asked Bob Hope if there was sex after seventy. He said yes, and that he particularly enjoyed the one in the spring.
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KIMOSABE wrote:

This type of heater works well to provide heat. Moisture is a byproduct of combustion. With an unvented heater you may run into condensation/rust problems. Be on the lookout for it.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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I used a similar heater in a 16x24 uninsulated shop (in Arkansas) and it was more than warm enough when the temps were in the 20's
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INSULATE I use those interlocking rubber mats and noted it helps keep my feet from freezing (concrete floor) in addition to the comfort when standing. Those circular kerosene heaters (
http://www.yourheater.com/dh2304.jpg ) do all right but send most heat directly UP over themselves. I use one in my basement and can operate it for 24 hours on a fill and keep the basement at 66 when the outside temps are dropping below thirty.
In my insulated garage, I can get by with a little ceramic heater or one of those electric heaters that have the "ribbons" of metal and a little fan to keep the chill off.
I'm not too sure I would want one of those Propane infrared heaters with all the saw dust generated on a good day and that MODINE HOT DAWG HD30 - $479.00 thing would buy you a lot of insulation.
You may be able to rent a construction heater and try it out before plopping down the $279 or so plus the cost of the propane and tank (another $50?) - again, that would buy a lot of fiberglass bats.
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I don't know if anyone else mentioned this, but one of the primary products of combustion is water. Not sure how many pounds of water per pound of fuel. But all of it will recondense when the temperature again drops.
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MikeWhy wrote:

Not all combustion, correct? Gasoline and Propane yes, wood no?
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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Correct, pure carbon would not produce water as a product of combustion.

Wood, yes. There is hydrogen in that there cellulose and one of the products of combution of wood is H2O. Maybe not as much as propane or other hydrocarbons, but still some.
Bill Ranck Blacksburg, Va.
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