Horse Logging is the only way.....

If you would like to know more about the horse logging services I offer email me at either snipped-for-privacy@bellsouth.net or at snipped-for-privacy@bellsouth.net . I only offer these services in Kentucky and at this point in time we are about 5-8 months out before our next free spot. Thanks Keith
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. I only offer these services in Kentucky and

spot.
You've been advertising this for a couple of weeks now. Don't you think you are overstepping the bounds of advertising on a non-commercial USENET newsgroup? I sure do. This is the fourth or fifth post about wanting to buy logs or to peddle your services. Since you will only do this in KY, why not advertise locally instead of an international newsgroup?
If you want to educate people on the benefits of horse logging, make a web page and point us to it.We'd have interest and maybe learn a lot. If all you want to do is make money from the participants here, screw off already. The only posts you have made to this group are selling something from bandsaw mill, to chainsaws, to logs. You don't participate in a meaningful way, just use the group as your personal sales arena. Ed
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He has definitely been added to my KillList
John
wrote:

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yeah, he said!!!
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

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Oops, that should be "Yeah, what he said".
Mark wrote:

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How do you mill a horse, anyway? HorseMizer? Chainsaw mill and a waterproof poncho? Wonder what kind of resaw capacity you'd need.
GTO(John)
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I guess a chainsaw mill - remember Animal House - should do.

waterproof
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Rumor mill has it that it's a _cinch_, although beyond the scope of Neanders.
Equine-Nahm-ity is a necessary attribute for the task..
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On Sun, 18 Apr 2004 13:22:52 -0700, LowImpact wrote:

I chucked a horse into the lathe and turned it down into three large dogs and a few squirrels.
What does the stump (stumps?) look like after you log a horse?
When the horse starts to fall do you still yell "Timber!" or maybe "Hi ho Silver"?
Sorry, I'll move the glue pot a little further away...
Kim
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"LowImpact" wrote in message

....SNIP... I only offer these services in Kentucky and

Beyond the spam issue, horse logging can actually be more destructive than modern tractor or cable logging - just slower in the process.
Horses follow the same path over and over both out to the trees and back. All of their weight is concentrated on 4 fairly small hooves (think pounds per square inch). Horses do not lift the end of the log off of the ground so it tends to plow into the soil churned up by their hooves. They cannot work steep ground so he roads they travel are generally longer than those for a modern rubber tired skidder. Thus you need more road per acre logged and roads equal erosion.
Of course modern logging equipment if used carelessly can tear up a great deal more ground much quicker than any horse ever though of. Used cautiously however modern equipment is actually gentler to the ground than horses.
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snipped-for-privacy@excite.com (ClearCut) writes:
[...]

And damage the Trees that are supposed to be left standing.

Have you ever seen that happen or heard someone tell about heresay tales of modern equipment cautiously used in a forrest? In a time when "cleaning up a forrest road" means smash everything up to 5 meters away from the road border into tiny bits, cutting trees at 1 meter height because that's quicker with the chainsaw?
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
  Click to see the full signature.
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You're obviously unfamiliar with current hardwood practice in the US, which is what Clearcut was referencing. Of course, here in MI the harvest is planned to take advantage of the frozen ground, limiting impact. Clearcutting softwood can be left for summer. Less bugs, too.
I would not presume that the horse loggers in KY would trod the same skid path into muck for selective cuts, doesn't make sense. Old boys here used the hoods of junked autos as skid plates on soft ground, wheels on hard.
Oh yes, I live in hardwood country, and some of the nicest people I know are loggers.
(ClearCut) writes:

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(ClearCut) writes:

I am a professional forester. Logging is done either well or poorly. I have been on logging shows that after a very few years, it is difficult to tell when the last entry occurred. I have also seen hack jobs that scream "logged over" for decades after the fact. It is the hack jobs that scream out at you.
The praise or blame for every logging job rests on the shoulders of the landowner who dictates what can and cannot be done on the property, the forester (if one is used) who translates the landowner's intentions into on the ground instructions, and the logger who implements those in instructions.
If the landowner says to the logger - often bypassing using a forester - "make as much money as you can, I don't care what it looks like," you get a hack job. Landowners working with a good logger (yes there are good loggers) can harvest timber repeatedly and in a sustainable manner. Over the long term they make much more money, while still protecting the land.
Protecting leave trees is relatively simple when working with skidders. Designate bumper trees along the skid trails. These are harvested in the last pass. I had one job with residual old growth trees in the stand that the landowner wanted undamaged. In the contract the logger agreed to a fine of $2,500 for any damage to any old growth tree and $250 for damage to a young growth leave tree. The logger did not pay a penny in fines.
Some impact occurs in all logging operations - horse, skidder, cable, or helicopter. No one technique is suitable for all situations.
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