Home-made Oil finish?

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A friend gave me this recipe for home-made oil finish for rustic furniture.
2 parts Linseed Oil 1 part Mineral Turpentine 1 part vinegar
My question is which vinegar ? The dark brown or white. Does it matter? Can I try both to see which looks best?
I will be using on white pine and gum tree.
Thanks, Tana
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Tana wrote:

This recipe is a variant of the well-known "salad dressing" furniture treatment. It's intended for cleaning or restoring the finish on existing pieces, not for finishing new timber from scratch.
It's not a good finish for new work and I wouldn't use it. It's basically raw linseed oil, which you could use just as well on its own.
Linseed oil has uses for "rustic" work like these http://codesmiths.com/shed/things/boxes/forsale / but it also has drawbacks. It goes very yellow with age (OK on pine, terrible on maple). It's also not a good "drying" oil, so you must apply it in extremely thin layers and even then you can sometimes have trouble getting it to cure well.
As a furniture restorer, then this mixture is effective but a little crude. Don't go slathering it around on fine work - it doesn't do much, and what it does do tends to involve leaving linseed behind to go yellow afterwards. It also builds up after many uses (I think the Winterthur collection had a problem with this) into a thick "peanut butter" that's hard to remove.

Plainest, simplest unflavoured spirit vinegar you can find. Good for cleaning glass too.
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Tana wrote:

Almost certainly it will not.

Of course. Let us know what you find.

Vinegar???? How are you going to keep it mixed, by adding lecithin?
Sure that wasn't supposed to be _varnish_?
A common formula for homemade wiping varnish is equal parts, by volume, of oil, thinner, and oil-based varnish.
Others prefer a higher proportion of solids, up to a 1-2-3 ratio, one part oil, two parts solvent, three parts varnish.
Don't substitute water-based 'varnish'.
Basicly these mixes are thinned long-oil varnishes, probably not much different from thinning spar varnish.
--

FF


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Snip
I have heard that the production finish for rustic furniture is used motor oil and or diesel fuel.
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diesel fuel is translucent. I have a diesel generator in a wooden enclosure, and there is a "diesel fuel finish" on the bottom. It looks waxy and translucent.
I myself wanted to use motor oil for wood finish (on some outdoor pieces), but never got to actually doing that...
i
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I suspect that either would not be good for human contact.
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I agree. That would be for pieces that are a base of something, some rough outdoor stuff.
i
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but never got to actually doing that... <<
Not good at all for your backside. As a young man we used diesel fuel for form break treatment when we were pouring lots of concrete.
Then we used motor oil thinned with gas if we ran out of that.
It was the only time we really needed to wear gloves as we got a red, irritated burn on our hands from working with the forms after treatment.
Robert
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Ignoramus3644 wrote:

Not real satisfactory for many reasons, the most significant of which is the fact it will take "forever" to fully dry (if it ever does) and tends to collect dirt.
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Thanks... Live and learn!
i
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How do you know that? It sounds like there is a story here. C'mon, fess up.
Steve

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On Thu, 11 Aug 2005 19:01:52 GMT, "Steve Peterson"

My sister and brother-in-law use transmission oil once a year on the teak trim on their boat. It still lokks good after 18 years.
Dave Hall
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I have used this formula for cleaning finished furniture using 0000 steel wool, but never as a finish.

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On Thu, 11 Aug 2005 15:04:49 GMT, the opaque "Leon"

Used oil adds that yummy color-me-Redneck aroma, don't it? <heh heh heh>
- Inside every older person is a younger person wondering WTF happened. --- http://diversify.com Website Application Programming
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Yeah, I always looked at as CRAP furniture sold in upper end furniture stores so that they could offer the unknowing something to buy.
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Leon wrote:

G'day all, The farm house in which I lived as a kid, was constructed from clad with Jarrah (Rough Sawn) boards up to about 5 feet high with the top portion being asbestos sheeting................. Every year we used to get an old mop and give the boards a good coating of sump oil.(Which the old man would save from the oil changes in the cars, tractors and other machinery). I'd reckon that them boards would still be as good as new, although very black. Would get a nasty stain on your trousers, I assume, if it was used for furniture. Regards John
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<snip>

John, just the thought of the reaction on the face of one of our California inspectors, on seeing that house, made my morning!
I bet the paint was made with lead, too. Funny how we try to keep everyone safe. Farm life in Oz certainly has different risks than city life in California...
Thanks for posting.
Patriarch
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Patriarch wrote:

G'day Patriarch, Today I'm sure it would give our local health and safety officers heart attacks ;) I'd say the paint was lead based. It was a gloss oil paint, green. With the roof being corrugated iron painted silver. My Grandfather was in charge of the water supply in Kalgoorlie and used to visit the farm every Xmas, about 1000 ks travel. He "sourced" the paint. Strange coincidence, the Silver Frost was the same colour as the water supply used for it's pipelines and all their buildings were painted green ??? :) John
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my guess is that it doesn't matter.. a friend that does butcher block uses about the same thing, but with lemon oil instead of the vinegar... I think that would be my choice, also..
Personally, my skill level doesn't include making my own finishes... there are so many proven commercial ones out there that I'd rather spend my time developing other skills.. YMMV
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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mac davis wrote:

FWIW, you can easily take commercial finishes and adjust them to suit your own needs. Probably the simplest and my favorite is to take spar varnish and thin it with equal parts turpentine and BLO. It makes a great wiping varnish that is easier to use (and easier to control the level of buildup) than the stuff straight out of the can.
You can also play around with substituting tung oil for BLO, and by adjusting the levels of solvent vs. varnish vs. oil, you can achieve different results.
With any finish, experiment on scrap first or you *will* be experimenting on the real thing (tmPaullyRad).
Chuck Vance (BTDT, got the t-shirt)
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