Hemlock wood poisoning

Does anyone know if seasoned and dried hemlock has any undesirabl
characteristics? I want to use hemlock because of its workability an straight grain, for children's toys, boxes, etc. But I remember tha Socrates (?) was poisoned with hemlock
-- victoria
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
: Does anyone know if seasoned and dried hemlock has any undesirable : characteristics? I want to use hemlock because of its workability and : straight grain, for children's toys, boxes, etc. But I remember that : Socrates (?) was poisoned with hemlock.
Different plant. Water hemlock (the poisonous stuff) is a herbacious plant. It's not the same as hemlock the tree, although some sources say the tree was named for the plant due to the tree's needles smelling like water hemlock.
    -- Andy Barss
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
says...

This is the poisonous hemlock: http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gefleckter_Schierling
Nothing to do with the tree. Sorry, didn't find a link in English, but you get a nice picture here with flowers, seeds etc ... .... never knew it was that poisonous when I was a kid: we used to whittle flutes out of it since the stems are hollow. Anyway, the poison seems to reside mostly in unripe seeds, or so the article says.
-P.
--
=========================================
firstname dot lastname at gmail fullstop com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The link to the english version (Conium) is on the left side of the german page.
scott
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Workability and straight grain? My impression, perhaps totally incorrect, is that hemlock is best used green since when it dries it is impossible to work because it splinters and cracks easily. I guess the poison issue has been put to bed. Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
victoria wrote:

It's unworkable and the grain is anything but straight? You can find _much_ better timber than this, even in the UK. Try douglas fir ("red deal") at least it's as commonly available as hemlock.
At least it's not poisonous though - that's a different hemlock and no relation.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conium

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Seasoned and dried, as in from your yard tree or firewood pile, you will find it to be very light in both color and weight, that it sands easily but also can splinter badly, and knots can be very tough. For this reason you may therefore not want to make items that very young children will be likely to chew on. There's no poison in it at all, though. I have some nice boxes and frames made of it, and a handful of turned items too. If you can find sections that are clear, then yes you can get some attractive straight grained wood. Most lumberyard hemlock is construction grade, however. If you can find a softwood mill in your area you'll be more likely to get nicer stuff.
J.
victoria wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.