Hearing Protection

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Probably discussed here all the time but then again I'm not here all the time. Can I get some suggestions for muff type hearing protection. I have a small basement workshop crammed with noise making tools. I have a pair of Thunder 29's but the headband has broken and thus they don't fit as well. Thanks in advance. Jerry
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Maskman wrote:

Like the Peltier (sp?) neck band type myself, doesn't get in the way of my face shield or dust mask, just check the attenuation graph is good for the type of sound your dealing with, some are poor at certain frequencies. One day I'll buy some with FM radio built in, maybe...
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wrote:

Peltor. Keep an eye out on the UK mil-surplus trade for Peltors, but get the fat-dome sort, not the useless thin-dome under-the-helmet ones.
I used to have a set of Peltier earmuffs, but one ear got roasted and the other got frostbite...
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Shouldn't have put in the batteries then...
Andy Dingley wrote:

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You need a reverse polarity switch.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

OOPS, bit of a mis-spelling that, probably crossed wires with a laser diode cooling project thats in me mind at the moment (work)...
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On Sun, 05 Dec 2004 22:58:33 GMT, Badger
Howdy,
I will mention that I have a pair, and though it is certainly pleasant to listen to the radio while I am on my tractor, the noise reduction aspect is not great.
All the best,
--
Kenneth

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Get a pair that's comfortable to wear, otherwise you'll be less likely to put them on. I have tried in-the-ear types that are supposed to be better at reducing dBs, but I find these to be a hassle and somewhat uncomfortable. I like the lightweight muff type.
wrote:

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I prefer the ear plugs and find them more comfortable than the ear-muffs. Maybe if I found a set of muffs that didn't spring too tight and didn't flatten my ears like little pancakes, I would have a different opinion. I buy sets of 100 pairs of plugs and re-use each pair several times -- a box lasts a long time.

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On Sun, 5 Dec 2004 19:09:07 -0700, Mark & Juanita wrote

I'm a target shooter and have always prefered the yellow foam in-the-ear type. Much better for me since most muffs preclude wearing a brimmed hat and I find I can hear fine (conversation, etc.) with them in. _Everyone_ Is different WRT this however. The key is comfort and convenience, if you don't like them you won't use them. Every high dB encounter causes damage, even "just one more pass" with the planer without protection.
-Bruce
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==============================================I am a Skeet and Trap shooter ...and until about 5 years ago I fired at least 500 rounds each week in competation, and more for practice...
I too prefer plugs over muffs ... (Lee Sonic is the brand I use...) However in my shop....I have not found I really need to use them...
Bob Griffiths. . .
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On Mon, 06 Dec 2004 09:36:22 -0500, Bob G.

Are you already damaged? <G>
My FIL dosen't "need" hearing protection either, but we have to repeat everything we say to him more than once.
Barry
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On Sun, 05 Dec 2004 20:54:07 -0700, Bruce wrote:

Does shooting require a different i-t-e foam than the Walgreens plugs have? (I.e., you're only interested in short-duration narrow-band events.)
Back on topic, I go with the Hearos 33 Db plugs. I wear them to movies, too. Besides the hearing-safety issue, it's just so much more relaxing to block out the din of power tools.
--
"Keep your ass behind you"
vladimir a t mad scientist com
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I know they're pricey, but has anyone tried the noise reduction phones from Bose? I've heard my brother's pair (he uses them for traveling) but he's never put them to any power tool test.
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On Mon, 06 Dec 2004 02:15:55 GMT, "mark"

Howdy,
I had two pair...
They work when there is a noise at a steady frequency (such as in an airplane) but they have a very serious flaw:
I was wearing pair #1 on a flight, and fell asleep. I was awakened to a fierce high frequency whine. It had, of course, come from the headset.
Eventually, I found that by manipulating the ear cups, I could make the set produce that noise, and so returned them to Bose.
They gave me a new pair with no hassle.
Pair #2 (a newer model that allows the earcups to rotate for packing) did precisely the same thing in it also produced the same deafening noise.
I returned those and was amazed when the Bose storekeeper said "Yeah, they all do that..."
In my opinion, the Bose noise-canceling headset is a dangerous item to wear.
All the best,
--
Kenneth

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I've used them in light aircraft, and see no reason why they wouldn't work in a shop. I'd be nervous about dropping them.
However, earmuffs the cost of a 13" planer aren't my ideal solution. <G>
Barry
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Ba r r y wrote:

You might find this of interest <http://www.thetravelinsider.info/roadwarriorcontent/planequietnc6headphones.htm . Bose isn't the only game in town.
Woodcraft has an active noise cancelling earmuff with no audio connection for 30 bucks <http://www.woodcraft.com/Woodcraft/product_family.asp?family%5FidQ28&gift lse&0pt%2Easp%2Cdept%5Fid%3D10000%26Tree%3D%2CDepartments&1pt%2Easp%2Cdept%5Fid%3D1049%26menu%5Fid%3D%26Tree%3D0%2CShop%20Safety%20%26%20Accessories&2pt%2Easp%2Cdept%5Fid%3D1110%26menu%5Fid%3D%26Tree%3D1%2CSafety%20%2D%20Ears&Giftlse&mscssid142FF9ED5241F095D266AE2DE68E8E>
In the same price range as Bose, but a pro product, not a consumer product, and again with no music capability, you find "Wolf Ears", <http://www.ayoob.com/cgi-bin/miva?Merchant2/merchant.mv+Screen=PROD&Store_Code=Ayoob&Product_Code 30A>. I met someone who had a set of those at a shooting range one time and he let me try them--they are absolutely superb in that environment--not sure how they work with power tools though, but suspect they're fine. Note that they're built into a David Clark Model 27, which is an excellent passive hearing protector in its own right.
Or if price is no object, David Clark has a good range of electronic noise cancelling headsets in the $600 range <http://www.davidclark.com/HeadsetPgs/aviation.shtml#enc .

--
--John
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On Mon, 06 Dec 2004 12:07:15 GMT, Ba r r y

I've never tried the Bose ones, but if you're looking for something a little less expensive, Koss makes a pair for around $20. The plugs that come with the headphones (They are in-ear bud style) aren't really very good as far as NRR goes, but you can get any pair of foam earplugs, and put them on the phones as a replacement. I've tried a bunch of different hearing protection, and finally just gave up and use the regular foam earplugs (without the headphone) these days. They do make your ears itch a bit for the first couple of months when they're in, but your ears do get used to them eventually. The biggest thing you can do to help with the itch is just to clean out your ears everytime you get out of the shower.

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I use a pair of Pelter.
Maskman wrote:

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calmly ranted:

Find the local Harbor Freight store and look for their sales. A kit with dust mask, goggles, and decent muffs is normally $10, on sale for $5 quite often. I got a couple extras last time. If you want more muffling, add foam earplugs, but I run the table saw, router, a gas weedeater, and a 9mm with the muffs on. They work just fine for all 4 tasks.
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