Hardiboard to cover steps?

I have three back steps which are under a overhang, but they do get spattered when it rains. They are pine over treated lumber and SWMBO wants the pine removed and something like TREX laid over them. I saw some hardiboard siding (?) which looks like 3/8 thick and yellow in color. Would this be acceptable if screwed down every 12 inches? Will it hold paint? How about wear and weather resistance? I've never used it but have used the grey cement board.
TIA
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On 4/26/2013 5:09 PM, G. Ross wrote:

Go with the TREX. No maintenance. The cement board depending on brand is pretty porous as it is meant to bond to mortar or a glue.
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I live in the soggy Northwest near Seattle. I've read that composite decking, such as Trex, still needs maintenance as in pressure washing in order to keep it from becoming mossy and slippery. What's been your experience?
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scritch wrote:

The manufacturer suggests that you not apply high pressure washing (see the site for the PSI), as it may/will disintegrate. So, I have not done so.
Bill
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On 4/26/2013 7:16 PM, scritch wrote:

I have made deck furniture out of it.. It has stayed out all year. It's heavy so it works well between chaise lounges to hold drinks and hold an umbrella. No moss problems, but it gets dirty. Some simple green cleans it
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The stuff on the deck by the pool is still in great shape. Even the areas where pool water is unlikely to reach (so the chlorinated water can be ignored) are just fine.
However, the decking on the north side of the house is in full shade. It's got algae or something growing on it, as does the vinyl siding.
If your decking can dry out and see some sun every once in a while, it'll probably be fine.
Puckdropper
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My experience -- not with my own deck, fortunately, just at a building where I was a visitor recently -- is that even fairly new Trex, with no visible moss, fungus, or anything else, is quite slippery when wet.
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No, neither Hardi siding, nor Hardi backerboard, will work for a stair tread, if that is what you mean. It is too brittle and will break in short order. Use a 5/4 composite material made for decks for your treads.
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"Swingman" wrote in message wrote:

No, neither Hardi siding, nor Hardi backerboard, will work for a stair tread, if that is what you mean. It is too brittle and will break in short order. Use a 5/4 composite material made for decks for your treads.
+1... the Hardiboard trim would be no good either despite being about an inch thick... it too would fail in short order.
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